Amélie Poinssot

Après des années de correspondances en Pologne puis en Grèce, expérience qui m'a amenée à travailler pour des médias aussi divers que La Croix, RFI, l'AFP... et Mediapart, je rejoins la rédaction en février 2014.

Pendant plus de cinq ans, j'y couvre l'actualité européenne, de la déstabilisation de l'Ukraine à la crise grecque en passant par la crise de l'accueil des exilé·es d'Irak et de Syrie, mais aussi la montée des nationalismes, les mobilisations sociales et les débats sur les alternatives possibles en Europe.

En mars 2019, je publie une enquête intellectuelle sur le Premier ministre hongrois, Dans la tête de Viktor Orbán (Actes Sud).

A l'été 2019, je change de secteur. Désormais, je travaille et fais des enquêtes sur les thématiques liées à l'agriculture : agro-business, lobbys, marchés agricoles, risques sanitaires, impacts sur le vivant, alternatives.

Consulter ici ma déclaration d'intérêts.

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Ses Derniers articles

  • 'Bloodlands' author Timothy Snyder on why Russia’s war against Ukraine is 'genocide'

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    Timothy Snyder: 'Russians can’t stop talking about their own genocidal intent.' © Photo Jiri Zerzon for Hospodarske Noviny Timothy Snyder: 'Russians can’t stop talking about their own genocidal intent.' © Photo Jiri Zerzon for Hospodarske Noviny

    In this interview with Mediapart, Yale University professor of history Timothy Snyder, a specialist on eastern European history and notably Ukraine, author of Bloodlands, his internationally acclaimed book about mass murders in central and eastern Europe beginning in the 1930s, argues why he believes Russia’s war against Ukraine amounts to genocide in the full legal sense of the term. He also sketches Ukraine’s long history of resistance to oppression, the singular character of its society, and why it is vital for the future Europe, and even Russia, that Ukraine wins the war.

  • European Commission VP Timmermans says Ukraine war has ‘increased urgency’ for a ‘sustainable society’

    Frans Timmermans, European Commission vice-president. © Photo Fred Marvaux/European Union Frans Timmermans, European Commission vice-president. © Photo Fred Marvaux/European Union

    The upheaval of Russia’s war against Ukraine has further tested the already challenging agenda for the introduction of the European Commission’s measures on climate change, and notably its ambitious ‘Green Deal’ programme aimed at making the EU carbon neutral by 2050. The man in the hot seat is Frans Timmermans, European Commission vice-president responsible for the Green Deal and climate change measures. In this interview with Mediapart, he discusses the impact on the bloc of the war in Ukraine, the fossil fuel quandary, why European agriculture must move away from intensive farming to a sustainable, environmentalist model, and why he calls upon political leaders to show the “courage to recognise the crisis that we are in”.

  • The emerging voting patterns of rural France

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    Election campaign posters in the village of Médréac, in  Brittany. © Photo Martin Bertrand / Hans Lucas via AFP Election campaign posters in the village of Médréac, in Brittany. © Photo Martin Bertrand / Hans Lucas via AFP

    The first round of voting earlier this month in France’s presidential elections showed notable political differences between the country’s regions, and also between rural areas and large urban centres. As next Sunday’s decisive second round of the elections approaches, Mediapart’s Amélie Poinssot turned to sociologist Benoît Coquard, a specialist researcher of rural communities, for his insight into the voting patterns that have emerged.

  • Intensive farming: the behind-the-scenes story of a French poultry giant’s vast expansion plan

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    File photo of a giant broiler house (not part of Duc’s network) in Plougoulm, Brittany, in 2012. © Photo Fred Tanneau / AFP File photo of a giant broiler house (not part of Duc’s network) in Plougoulm, Brittany, in 2012. © Photo Fred Tanneau / AFP

    After it was taken over by Dutch group Plukon in 2017, French poultry giant Duc began a massive development of its industrial production of chickens. This involved halting its production of organic and certified chickens, a major extension of its slaughterhouse at its HQ in northern Burgundy, and the future construction of 80 giant broiler houses in the neighbouring countryside. The expansion, which mirrors industrial poultry production practices elsewhere in France and Europe, has raised concerns locally over its environmental impact, and in a number of villages opponents speak of a climate of intimidation. Amélie Poinssot reports.

  • The growing evidence that agroecology could and should replace intensive farming

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    The post-war development in Europe of productivity-driven intensive farming, with its environmentally harmful use of synthetic pesticides, vast fields of monoculture, and industrial animal-rearing, could be feasibly replaced by large-scale organic farming, capable of feeding the continent’s populations under an agricultural umbrella system called agroecology. That is the conclusion of a large and growing body of international scientific research, and the subject of several recent studies published in France. Amélie Poinssot examines the evidence.

  • Saving biodiversity 'just as crucial' as tackling climate change, says French academic

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    Marine park at Tenia Island in New Caledonia in the South Pacific. © Photo Nicolas-Alain Petit / Biosphoto via AFP Marine park at Tenia Island in New Caledonia in the South Pacific. © Photo Nicolas-Alain Petit / Biosphoto via AFP

    The International Union for Conservation of Nature, which is currently holding its annual conference at Marseille in the south of France, has hit the headlines for its latest update on the number of animal species which face imminent extinction on the planet. But there are some experts who query whether the NGO's conserving strategy of preserving species in designated areas such as natural parks is the right one. Mediapart spoke with French geographer Estienne Rodary who argues that this modernist and colonial approach to the environment has become outdated in an inter-connected world. He says that the issues of biodiversity and climate change are interlinked and that when it comes to conserving nature the “carbon cost” of any policies needs to be taken into account. Amélie Poinssot reports.

  • French study identifies further grave illnesses linked to chemical pesticides

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    A farmer in the Sarthe département (county) of north-west France, filling up his crop dusting machine with a glyphosate product for use on his maize fields, April 2021. © Jean-François Monier / AFP A farmer in the Sarthe département (county) of north-west France, filling up his crop dusting machine with a glyphosate product for use on his maize fields, April 2021. © Jean-François Monier / AFP

    France’s National Institute of Health and Medical Research, INSERM, has published a report on its studies into the use of pesticides and the increasing evidence of their causal effect on grave pathologies, including cancers, among farmers and also among children. Amélie Poinssot interviews toxicologist Xavier Coumoul, a co-author of the report.  

  • French organic farmers 'forgotten' by the CAP

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    Gwénaël Floch sur son exploitation. © Amélie Poinssot / Mediapart Gwénaël Floch sur son exploitation. © Amélie Poinssot / Mediapart

    Gwénaël Floch runs a small but productive organic farm in Brittany, north-west France. He pays himself, like his employees, the minimum legal wage, while he also has bank loans to repay on initial investment in the business. He receives little more than 300 euros per year from the EU’s annual 58-billion-euro Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) subsidies, supposedly promoting organic agriculture, and which will be even less after the introduction of the new CAP in 2023. That is when organic small farms in France will lose the aid, however small, they are currently entitled to, and which prompted farmers to protest in Paris earlier this month. Amélie Poinssot reports from Brittany.

  • The MEPs shaping the Common Agricultural Policy and receiving its handouts

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    MEPs in a plenary session of the European Parliament in Brussels, September 16th 2020. © AFP MEPs in a plenary session of the European Parliament in Brussels, September 16th 2020. © AFP

    Among the Members of the European Parliament are a group of farmers and others with agricultural interests who benefit directly from the subsidies provided for in the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). The fact that many of them are at the forefront of negotiations to map out the reform of the CAP, to be put to a vote during this week, raises a clear question of conflicts of interest. Amélie Poinssot reports.

  • The ill-informed debate behind France’s lifting of neonicotinoids ban

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    A protest by the Extinction Rebellion movement during the parliamentary debates over the partial lifting of the ban on the use of neonicotinoids, October 5th 2020. © NurPhoto/AFP A protest by the Extinction Rebellion movement during the parliamentary debates over the partial lifting of the ban on the use of neonicotinoids, October 5th 2020. © NurPhoto/AFP

    The French parliament earlier this week approved a three-year exemption for sugar beet growers from a ban on the use of a class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids. The sugar beet sector has argued that its future was at stake because it was otherwise unarmed to counter the loss of crops caused by an aphid-borne virus disease. But the move outraged environmentalists who point to the inevitable effects of soil and water contamination by neonicotinoids, which are notably harmful for bees, and the dangers for human health. Amélie Poinssot highlights the ill-informed arguments presented in parliament in favour of a return of the controversial pesticides.