Mathilde Goanec

Diplômé de l'IUT de Lannion, en Bretagne, j'ai été journaliste pigiste pendant dix ans. A l'étranger tout d'abord (en Asie centrale et en Ukraine pendant 4 ans), puis à Paris. Des collaborations tous azimuts avec Libération, Le Temps, Le Soir, Regards, Le Monde Diplomatique, Alimentation Générale, Terra Eco, ou encore Mediapart... que j'ai rejoint pour de bon en mars 2015. Je suis aujourd'hui en charge des questions sociales. 

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  • The divisions behind the latest 'gilets jaunes' social protests in Paris

    Scenes from the first 'gilets jaunes' protests in Paris, November 17th, 2018. © E.S. Scenes from the first 'gilets jaunes' protests in Paris, November 17th, 2018. © E.S.

    This Saturday December 1st the so-called 'gilets jaunes' or yellow hi-vis vest protesters will take to the streets of central Paris for the third weekend in a row. This time other groups – unions, anti-racist movements and student groups – are also planning demonstrations in the capital. But while they might all be demonstrating at the same time, these different components of the current social movement sweeping across France are not all on the same wavelength when it comes to their aims and objectives. Mathilde Goanec, Dan Israel and Faïza Zerouala report.

  • Unions promise turbulence for Air France's new Canadian CEO

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    Benjamin Smith, newly appointed CEO of Air France-KLM. © Reuters/Clodagh Kilcoyne Benjamin Smith, newly appointed CEO of Air France-KLM. © Reuters/Clodagh Kilcoyne

    The appointment on Thursday of Air Canada COO Benjamin Smith as the new boss of Air France-KLM has been met with uproar among staff unions at the French arm of the group. They have fiercely protested the nomination of a foreigner at the helm of Air France, which they allege was driven by group shareholder Delta Airlines, but also the size of his remuneration package, well above that of his predecessor, and what they see as a plan to weaken Air France’s operations in favour of KLM. Mathilde Goanec reports on the furore which promises a turbulent touchdown for Smith next month.         

  • Angry French pensioners revolt over hike in social contributions payments

    French pensioners held nationwide protests on Thursday over a recent rise in a levy imposed on them to fund the country’s social security system, and which for many represents a yearly loss of several hundred euros. The demonstrations were organised by a united front of pensioners’ unions, who dismiss the government’s argument that the rise is necessary to finance a reduction in social security payments by young workers, what it calls a gesture of “inter-generational solidarity”. While the pensioners’ protest movement shows no signs of abating, some MPs among the ranks of Macron’s normally loyal LREM party have begun voicing their unease over the measure. Manuel Jardinaud, Mathilde Goanec and Romaric Godin report.   

  • Why France's rural populations feel 'abandoned'

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    The Aube département or county in the north-east of France is a rural area that also has pockets of industrialisation. Here, apart from the 'fake jobs' controversy surrounding right-wing candidate François Fillon, the presidential election campaign seems not to have had much of an impact so far. This has left the far-right Front National to take advantage of the relative indifference of the other candidates towards issues affecting those who live in the French countryside. Mathilde Goanec reports.

  • The rise in job insecurity in the French workplace

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    The problem of unemployment is France is well-documented and discussed each month when the latest jobless totals are published. Less well-known, however, is the issue of underemployment affecting people on short-term contracts, in temporary jobs, on workplace experience or those trying to become self-employed. As Mathilde Goanec explains, there are two constant factors in this world of workplace insecurity – a rapid turnover in jobs and ever-greater problems in eventually finding full-time fixed employment.

  • The fight to allow France's poor a dignified burial

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    Funeral costs in France can often be beyond the means of the least well-off and their surviving relatives. In one region an association has teamed up with an insurance company to offer low-cost cover to ensure that the poor can organise a dignified final ceremony. In other areas local associations are naming and shaming local councils in a bid to force them to carry out their legal obligations to provide decent burial arrangements for the most disadvantaged. Mathilde Goanec reports.

  • French judges in the dock over priest killer's release

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    Adel Kermiche, one of two men who attacked a church in Normandy on Tuesday morning and committed the horrific murder of an 86-year-old Catholic priest in the name of the Islamic State group, was at the time on conditional release from preventive detention. The revelation that he was wearing an electronic tag with permission to leave his home near to the church on weekday mornings has caused a storm of controversy in France, and fierce criticism of the judges who decided his release from prison in March, despite the objections of the public prosecutor's office. Mathilde Goanec hears from fellow magistrates of what they describe as a fine line in assessing the true danger individuals like Kermiche represent.

  • The anger and doubts fuelling France's oil refinery protests

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    Police move in to clear a blockade at the Fos-sur-Mer oil refinery in southern France on Tuesday May 24th, 2016. © Reuters Police move in to clear a blockade at the Fos-sur-Mer oil refinery in southern France on Tuesday May 24th, 2016. © Reuters

    Many oil refinery workers, rail workers and aviation staff are on strike or set to go out on strike as France suffers fuel shortages and a power struggle between the government and those opposed to controversial labour law reforms. Union activists have criticised the “extremely violent” actions of the state in removing the blockade at the Fos-sur-Mer oil refinery in the south of France. But despite the growing impact of their industrial action, union militants admit that they will not continue the action on their own indefinitely without the help of workers in other sectors. Mathilde Goanec reports.

  • London's 'dream' French cake shops turn to nightmare for sacked staff

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    Two years ago the French-owned Pâtisserie des Rêves opened two patisseries in London to considerable acclaim. “A cake shop like none other,” was how The Telegraph newspaper described one of the shops launched with the involvement of top French pastry chef Philippe Conticini. But just before Easter this year both stores closed abruptly and staff were not paid their final month's wages. Mathilde Goanec reports on the battle by the 22 former employees to get their money.

  • The true lives of those hidden behind France's jobless figures

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    Roselyne et Pascal © MG/MP Roselyne et Pascal © MG/MP

    Massaging unemployment figures has become a preoccupation for France’s socialist government, as the rising numbers of jobless threaten to put the final nail in President François Hollande’s political coffin ahead of presidential elections next year. The figures are presented in three categories, A, B and C, ranging from those without any professional activity – the official unemployed - to those who have partial jobs. But there are few differences between either section, all facing a desperate daily search for a proper job and liveable income, as illustrated in these four interviews by Mathilde Goanec.