The sleazy, easy anti-Semitism that blights French politics

By
This article is open access. Information protects us. I subscribe

Mediapart has made the choice of not imposing systematic moderation of the participative sections of the journal. Thank you for abiding by our charter regarding participative contributions. Mediapart may highlight some comments, and reserves the right to remove any comment that is not relevant to a given discussion, that is repeatedly copied, or of a crude or commercial nature.

All comments

Encore pire en anglais qu'en français, lourd et poussiéreux.

What C.Jacob and L.Wauqier said about DSK was totally out of the line and nonsense. (1) I mean, who cares ? Who cares about his money or where and how many houses he’s got, as long as he has made it honestly ? Besides, I don’t think that French expatriates are going to appreciate a lot...

Yet, with the latest events, I do sincerely hope that this confusion of "genres" by some French politicians is going to stop and that they are going to realise that due to their responsibility (in public), they could not possibly afford that anymore.

(1) One a side note, it’s too bad that the history of the IMF is not mentioned either here or in French. Indeed, the IMF is an institution created by the Bretton Woods system in 1944...

@ mhjozoux

Hey, why not helping instead of only criticising? By the way, I would like to see you writing an article in English and tell me if it’s that simple.

About the article, one great point : the notes on the bottom of the page. They add a lot of information.

Despite I agree a bit with mhjozoux (the translation is too literal), I do think it’s a good thing that a French media offers an English version of its contents. In Europe, most of all mainstream media (except French ones) do it. If we want a real place and voice in the world, French media have to evolve towards it. As far as I know, I am surprised - especially with internet - that actually there isn’t any partnerships between media from different countries, as there are between schools.

@AS B

This kind of discourse typically relies upon French idiosyncrasies, and in the case at hand, to such a degree that only an English-reader well-versed in French culture would understand it. But such a reader surely knows enough French to grasp the original text !

There are other articles in Mediapart that are translatable, and translated.

^ Agreed.

However, what I meant is that we’ve got to be supportive and lend our help in order to improve the site (which is as well ours as theirs) with a critical spirit (1) - i.e. by saying what is working and what is not - but by avoiding being manichean or negative (typically French :P ).

If I am not mistaken, the English version was launched just very few months ago. Furthermore, there are certainly many woes (technical or others) behind the scenes that we (readers) are certainly not aware of.

So, let’s give them some time, comprehensive and positive. Clin d'oeil

Let’s not forget too that the site is only 3 years old! I am sure if they got more resources (esp. financially) they could do better. Yet, for that we’ve got to be behind them.

It is something that French people can be proud of about and thanks Mediapart for doing it. They really worth it! (Believe it or not, but I do not say that a lot. At all.)

Regarding internet & information, French media are so, so late compared to worldwide foreign media.

(1) as you did much more on your second post Sourire than on your first one (hence my first reply)

PS : Mhjozoux, I am glad that you’ve posted a commented on an article in English Sourire, since most of time I fear to be the only one commenting on it. Now, I will be less afraid of doing so.

  • New
  • 09/03/2011 20:25
  • By

 

@ mhjozoux and AS B:

Thanks for your comments, and to AS B for your kind words also.

On the very important point of the 'literal' nature of the translation; we have set ourselves a rule at Mediapart English that all quotes from people and documents are always translated faithfully. This provides a rock-solid source of reference. We do not anglicize phrases or style that do not precisely match the meaning for the sake of easier reading, because this would be to undermine the reliability of the report. (Similarly, if someone is quoted in an article in their original language, but who may not have been entirely coherent in their use of that language, you would rightly expect to read exactly what they said, whether awkward or not).

Regarding the comment by mhjozoux on the complexity of the subject dealt with here, we chose it precisely because we believe it is interesting and informative for Anglophone readers, and offers an unusual insight into a number of political and historical events. Many of the articles published on the English-language pages of Mediapart are about issues that one would rarely see covered elsewhere, and certainly not on one, single site. They are sometimes complex, and can carry references to events that are not widely known outside France - hence also their interest to readers wishing to learn more about the country.

This is why we often include footnotes, and editor's notes and links in the text; these allow readers to better understand the subject and, via the links, to explore it further, and it was very pleasing to read AS B's comments on these.

With our best regards to both of you, and thanks for your interest our work,

the Mediapart English team.

 

Thanks a lot for your response.

Many of the articles published on the English-language pages of Mediapart are about issues that one would rarely see covered elsewhere, and certainly not on one, single site. They are sometimes complex, and can carry references to events that are not widely known outside France - hence also their interest to readers wishing to learn more about the country.

This is why we often include footnotes, and editor's notes and links in the text (...)

I am personally glad that a French media does it and on this way. Most of people do not know the behind scenes of the work in translation, neither do usually translators know the expectations of their readers.

Having been on both sides, it is a very difficult balance to maintain. IMHO

Therefore, I do believe that mhjozoux and you have got both some points.

Still, personally as a member, I can’t wait to see how the English on Mediapart version is going to evolve.

So, good luck for everything @ you and @ your team, Graham.

Yours,

AS B.

My question is what is the tarjet of such paper? Certainely not to make readers understand the French polical culture and present configuration.

About languages :

Sure, all French media should anglicize (better : americanize), so to accelerate the decaying of French language... for achieving faster the économical, political and cultural globalization of the Planet !!!

In my opinione, a more fair (équitable) approach of the problem would be to promote Esperanto language.

About antisemitism :

The author is right : a lot of French people (especially within less educated classes) have the feeling that the persons of jewish origin are not totally French - even if their ancestors were living in France for centuries !

Let us then fight such obscurantist opinion !

No mobilization without confidence
No trust without truth
Support us
Footnote number 3 on page 1 of this article was amended on March 9th. to make clear that French President Nicolas Sarkozy's Jewish roots are from his maternal grandfather.