Survivor of Charlie Hebdo attack recalls 'horror' at trial

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French cartoonist Corinne Rey, known as Coco, had gone outside for a cigarette when the brothers Cherif and Said Kouachi approached her and forced her to tap in the entry code for the magazine's office as they brandished a Kalashnikov.

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The French cartoonist who was forced by the attackers of the Charlie Hebdo weekly to let them into its offices said Tuesday that she had been traumatised by feelings of guilt as she recalled the horror of the January 2015 massacre, reports FRANCE 24.

Corinne Rey, 38, known as Coco, had gone outside on January 7, 2015, for a cigarette when the brothers Cherif and Said Kouachi approached her and forced her to tap in the entry code for the office as they brandished a Kalashnikov.

"I had a sense of dread," she said, her voice shaking with emotion.

"I was in distress, I could not think anymore," she told the trial of 14 suspected accomplices in the January 7-9 attacks on the magazine and a Jewish supermarket that left claimed 17 lives.

"I knew it was a Kalashnikov," she said, recalling the long climb up the stairs before entering the offices of Charlie Hebdo, with the Kouachi brothers "armed to the teeth".

"I was devastated, as if dispossessed of myself, I could no longer do anything. I moved towards the code keypad and I typed it in," she recalled. "I felt that the terrorists were approaching their goal, I felt them growing excited next to me."

Read more of this report from FRANCE 24.

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