The triple menace of Hollande's reform of the French constitution

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French MPs this week voted in favour of the government’s proposed reforms of France’s constitution, which include enshrining into fundamental law state of emergency powers and the stripping of French nationality from convicted terrorists. The highly controversial bill will next month be debated by the Senate, and must finally be presented to an extraordinary ‘Congress’ meeting of both houses. Mediapart editor François Bonnet argues here that the proposed reform of the constitution carries a triple menace that threatens the heart of French democracy, the future of the socialist party, and also President François Hollande's ambition to gain a second term of office.

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Almost three months after the November 13th terrorist attacks in Paris which left 130 people dead and more than 350 others wounded, a majority of French Members of Parliament (MPs) have approved the bill of law to amend France’s constitution and enshrine in fundamental law the state of emergency powers and the stripping of French nationality from convicted terrorists.