Good business, Bad business: Bill Emmott on the crisis in Italy

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In 2001, British weekly magazine The Economist published an investigation into tycoon-turned politician Silvio Berlusconi’s shady business empire under the headline ‘Why Silvio Berlusconi is unfit to lead Italy’. It earned the magazine and its then-editor, Bill Emmott, the full wrath of the Italian leader and several legal suits for defamation, all of which were ultimately thrown out. This year Emmott published an in-depth analysis of modern-day Italy, called Good Italy, Bad Italy, in which he argues why the country, now rid of Berlusconi, has reached a crucial societal and economic crossroads that allows no turning back to its past structure, and where the future path for change it will take is all but certain. Here he tells Mediapart’s Philippe Riès how the eurozone's third-largest economy was suffocated by “the desire of business to seize the state and to use it to serve its own selfish interest”.

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In his in-depth analysis of modern-day Italy published this year, Good Italy, Bad Italy, Bill Emmott, former editor-in-chief of British weekly magazine The Economist, argues why Italy has reached a crucial societal and economic crossroads that allows no turning back to its past structure and where the future path for change it will take is all but certain.