Liu Bolin, China's invisible artist, on how they 'killed the soul'

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Chinese artist Liu Bolin is one of a new generation of dissident artists that have emerged in China in recent years. His art is a double play on what the visible and invisibile. The artist disappears into the scene, camouflaged by fine paintwork, an act that represents and denounces the repression of individuality under crushing state power. Earlier this spring, his works were showcased in a series of exhibitions in Moscow, Paris and New York. He granted a rare interview to Mediapart’s Hugo Vitrani, published here along with a selection of his photographic works, and video reportages.

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Liu Bolin belongs to a new generation of dissident artists that have emerged in China in recent years. Born in Shandong province, in north-eastern China, in 1973, he has developed an unusual, striking art form in which he pictures himself merging with his surroundings like a chameleon.