DNA study finds Europeans really are united - by their ancestors

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Take two Europeans living today each in their separate, neighbouring countries and the chances are that they have 100 common ancestors over a period stretching back 2,500 years – and between two and 12 family common to both over a period of 1,500 years. That is the remarkable finding of a recent study by researchers from the University of California, who conclude that every modern-day European is a descendant of the same group of ancestors who lived 1,000 years ago. Michel de Pracontal reports.

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Take two Europeans living today in separate, neighbouring countries and the chances are that they have 100 common ancestors over a period stretching back 2,500 years – and between two and 12 family common to both over a period of 1,500 years, according to a recent study by researchers from the University of California.