Keyword: Algeria

Anger as Algerian soldiers confirmed for France’s Bastille Day parade

Planned presence of three representatives of Algerian military on July 14th causes dismay in Algeria and among far-right groups in France.

French city of Nice bans foreign flags before Algeria match

The right-wing mayor Christian Estrosi announced ban until end of tournament following riots after the last two Algerian games.

France’s Le Pen calls for end of dual nationality in Algeria World Cup row

Far-right leader says disturbances in France after Algeria's win show immigration policy had 'failed' and that dual-nationals refuse to 'assimilate'.

Jubilation and arrests on France’s streets as Algeria progress in World Cup

Algerians in France celebrated their team's achievement in reaching knockout stages; there were 74 arrests as some fans clashed with police.

Hollande quip about Algeria sparks diplomatic row

French president offered his 'sincere regrets' for causing any offence over a joke that his interior minister had survived a trip to Algeria this month.

Disgraced French general and Algeria torturer dies

General Paul Aussaresses was convicted in 2003 for defending torture after admitting his role at the head of “death squad” during the Algerian War.

Algeria doctor jailed for child-trafficking to France

The medic was sentenced to 12 years in jail for abducting children born to single mothers and selling them in France for adoption.

The Guantánamo prisoner the US wants to release but who France refuses to take

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The US detention camp of Guantánamo Bay in Cuba continues to hold 166 prisoners, of which some 100 are officially regarded as ready for release. But many of these remain trapped within the camp because returning them to their countries of origin is considered by the US as too risky either for security reasons or for their personal safety. Algerian national Nabil Hadjarab, 32, (pictured) is one of those. His situation could be resolved if he were released to France, where he was raised and where his family reside and are ready to look after him. But, writes Mediapart international affairs specialist Thomas Cantaloube, Hadjarab’s freedom is blocked by the French authorities who continue to ignore appeals for his transfer and who, by doing so, contribute to the status quo at the highly controversial camp that President Barack Obama promised, in vain, he would close.    

A daughter's literary tribute to French mathematician tortured to death in Algeria

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 © Ernest Pignon Ernest © Ernest Pignon Ernest

Michèle Audin was just three years old when her mathematician father Maurice was tortured and killed by the French army in Algiers in 1957. Today Michèle, herself a celebrated mathematician, has published a book which does not recount the tragic circumstances of her father's death, but instead celebrates his life in a style that is both concise and deeply moving. Dominique Conil reviews A brief life.

 

French colonization of Algeria "brutal": Hollande

President Francois Hollande acknowledged France's colonization of Algeria had been "brutal and unfair" but stopped short of making an apology.

Eyeing growth, France seeks to smooth Algeria ties

President François Hollande travels to Algeria to seek greater access to former colony's oil wealth in bid to lift France's own flagging economy.

After decades of denial, France recognises 1961 police massacre of Algerians in Paris

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French President François Hollande has ended more than 50 years of official silence over the massacre by Paris police of an estimated several hundred Algerians demonstrating for their country’s independence from France. “On October 17th 1961, Algerians demonstrating for the right to independence were killed during a bloody repression,” read a brief statement by Hollande. “France recognizes these events with lucidity. Fifty one years after this tragedy, I pay homage to the memory of the victims.” It was the first public recognition by a French president of the killings and was hailed by campaigners and historians who had lobbied for decades for France to assume what was the deadliest act of repression on its own soil since World War II. Lénaïg Bredoux reports.

Algeria, France tussle over archives 50 years after split

When French soldiers and administrators left Algeria they took historical artefacts, books and maps - a national heritage that remains in France.

A story of France

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The initial information about Toulouse killer Mohamed Merah suggests that his is a story of modern France. While the Presidency and certain media commentators would like to stop all debate about what this event means for our society, the precise opposite is true. Like the earlier case of Algerian-born Khaled Kelkal, who was shot dead by gendarmes in 1995 after being implicated in a wave of bomb attacks in France, the story of Mohamed Merah holds up a mirror to society. And, says Mediapart editor François Bonnet, it raises vital questions for presidential candidates who seek to provide an alternative to the current presidency.

The winds of the Arab Spring blow towards Algeria

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This year, Algeria, the largest of the Maghrebi countries of North Africa, will mark 50 years of independence from its former ruler France. But the celebrations are set to be heavily subdued by the population’s widespread frustration over social inequalities, unemployment, and the decrepitude of public institutions and infrastructures, the very same issues that prompted the Arab Spring uprisings among its neighbours to the east. Pierre Puchot examines the indicators that suggest the Algerian regime may be the next to fall to a popular revolt.