Keyword: Charlie Hebdo

French PM pledges 'implacable response' to terror threat

Addressing French parliament on Tuesday, Manuel Valls warned 'very serious risks remain', as hunt for accomplices to terror attacks continued.

How the Paris terrorists slipped off intelligence radar

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Les frères Kouachi, lors du braquage d'une station-service dans l'Aisne, le 8 janvier 2015. © Vidéo-surveillance Les frères Kouachi, lors du braquage d'une station-service dans l'Aisne, le 8 janvier 2015. © Vidéo-surveillance

The two brothers who last week carried out the shooting attack on the offices of Charlie Hebdo magazine were the object of separate surveillance operations by French intelligence services between 2011 and 2014, which was halted last summer after it apparently failed to uncover evidence that they were involved in terrorist activity, Mediapart can reveal. Meanwhile, the third terrorist, Amedy Coulibaly, who killed five people during the Paris terror attacks last week, fell completely off the radar of anti-terrorist services after his release in March last year from prison where he had been serving time for his involvement in a plot to free a convicted terrorist from jail. Fabrice Arfi reports.

Charlie Hebdo to print three-million copies of post-massacre magazine

The weekly, which normally has a print run of 60,000 copies, will also be published in several languages when it hits newsstands on Wednesday.

France mobilizing 10,000 troops after deadly Paris attacks

Defence minister announces use of soldiers on home soil with 4,700 personnel deployed at France's 717 Jewish schools.

After the mass marches in France – what comes next?

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More than three-and-a-half million people took to the streets of France on Sunday. They were the biggest demonstrations seen in the country since the World War II liberation of France in 1944. Those who marched did so with a variety of different hopes but with one single demand: to raise the level of public debate in this country. It is now down to the government to pick up the theme, argues Mediapart's editor François Bonnet, even if, since his election in 2012, President François Hollande, and also his prime minister Manuel Valls, have shown themselves to be deaf to the idea.

Paris attacks: President Hollande to hold security meeting

Meeting follows Sunday's massive marches but also comes amid questions over how militants known to authorities were able to launch deadly raids.

France terror attacks prompt historic mass protest marches

 © Graham Tearse © Graham Tearse

Four days after the massacre at Charlie Hebdo magazine, followed by the murders of two police officers and two bloody sieges which saw four people executed in a Jewish supermarket, the people of France have taken to the streets in record numbers - 3.7 million - in a day of solidarity with the 17 victims of the attacks. For the first time in a quarter of a century the French president marched with the people as François Hollande joined more than 40 world leaders on the streets of Paris which he said had become the “capital of the world” for the day. But the most moving part of the massive march between two major squares in Paris, the place de la République and the place de la Nation, part of the biggest public gatherings seen in France since the Liberation in 1944, was the volume of ordinary citizens who turned out to show support for the victims' families and their determination that people's freedoms should not be undermined by terrorists. Mediapart reports on the turnout in words and pictures (updated Monday).

France attacks: world leaders to join crowds at Paris march

The emotional march, which is expected to attract more than a million people, will be led by relatives of the victims of last week's attacks.

'Terror cells' said to have been 'activated' in France

Police source says officers were told to erase their social media presence and carry weapons at all times because of terror sleeper cell threat.

Charlie Hebdo killings: did intelligence services overlook threat from terror network?

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Photo de surveillance policière de 2010 de Chérif Kouachi avec Djamel Beghal © DR Photo de surveillance policière de 2010 de Chérif Kouachi avec Djamel Beghal © DR

The murder of a policewoman and the bloody siege at a Jewish supermarket carried out by a known associate of the two suspects in the Charlie Hebdo massacre indicates that an organised group was behind last week's terror attacks. Mediapart has had access to documents from an anti-terrorist investigation in 2010  showing that two of last week's gunmen were involved back then with a radicalised French network that was considering future “martyr operations”. These were supermarket hostage taker Amedy Coulibaly and Charlie Hebdo massacre suspect Chérif Kouachi. As Fabrice Arfi and Karl Laske report, the revelations will inevitably raise questions about whether more could have been done by the intelligence services to prevent last week's bloody events.

Fourth Paris terror suspect 'on the run' in Syria

Hayat Bourmeddience, the 26-year-old partner of kosher supermarket killer Amedy Coulibaly, may have flown to Turkey on January 2nd.

Charlie Hebdo suspects killed in firefight as sieges end in bloodshed

 © BFMTV © BFMTV

Chérif Kouachi and Saïd Kouachi, the two men wanted for the shooting massacre of 12 people in an attack on satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo on Wednesday, were killed by police late Friday afternoon after an eight-hour siege of a building close to Roissy-Charles-de-Gaulle airport. Meanwhile, Amedy Coulibaly, a gunman reported to have jihadist links to the Kouachi brothers, was also killed by police after they stormed a kosher supermarket in south-east Paris where earlier on Friday he had taken 16 people hostage. Four of the hostages died, apparently murdered by Coulibaly at the start of the siege, and another four were reported to be seriously wounded. In a phone interview with French TV station BFMTV before he died, Chérif Kouachi said he represented al-Qaeda's Yemeni branch, while Coulibaly apparently told the station he represented the organisation Islamic State and was acting in "synchronisation" with the Kouachi brothers. Meanwhile, police in France are still hunting a woman described as the partner and accomplice of Coulibaly’s, and who is said to be potentially “armed and dangerous”. This report by Michael Streeter and Graham Tearse.

Charlie Hebdo massacre: the dilemma for French Muslims

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As the first cracks appear in the “national unity” urged by President François Hollande, the spotlight has been turned on the reaction of French Muslims. Ahead of Sunday's 'Republican march' to show solidarity over the Charlie Hebdo killings, the far right and sections of the Right have called on France's Muslims to condemn the massacre publicly. On the Left, opinions are divided on the issue. Mediapart's Hubert Huertas argues that we are faced with two very different visions of France – one that demands assimilation, the other that embraces diversity.

Hostages taken in Paris supermarket - gunman linked with police murder

Reports say gunman holding up to 5 hostages in kosher supermarket is linked to Charlie Hebdo killers and is suspect in policewoman murder.

Charlie Hebdo hunt: Police surround Paris suspects

At least one hostage has been taken at a printing business in the town of Dammartin-en-Goële, north east of Paris, according to reports.