Emmanuel Macron

Macron’s new government: more of the same from a president in denial

France— Analysis

A new French government was announced on Monday, replacing the smaller interim government formed following Emmanuel Macron’s re-election as president in April. It also follows the stinging losses of Macron’s centre-right party in June’s legislative elections, after which the president pledged to honour what he called “the will for change that the country has clearly expressed”. But instead, writes Ilyes Ramdani in this presentation and analysis of the new government, the 41-strong ministerial line-up is simply a larger helping of more of the same.  

Macron says parties must cooperate after he loses control of parliament

France— Link

In his first public comments since the election, France’s president said that agreements needed to be found across party lines and that he would seek over the next weeks to establish a working majority.

Uncertain future: how 2022 elections confirmed France's radically different political landscape

France— Analysis

The outcome of France's legislative elections on Sunday shows the extent to which the country's political map has been redrawn in recent years. There are now three main blocs and groups of voters; Emmanuel Macron's centre-right, the Left and the far-right. But the composition of the new National Assembly, in which Macron's coalition has the single largest bloc of MPs but lacks an overall majority, raises as many questions as answers about the political future. Fabien Escalona assesses the uncertainties that lie ahead.

Macron turns down French PM Borne's resignation offer

France— Link

Meanwhile, Macron’s discussions with opposition leaders will start on Tuesday with Christian Jacob, head of the rightwing Les Républicains (LR) party, which could be courted to give the president a parliamentary majority.

How Macron became the far-right's useful idiot

France— Opinion

By playing at being the sorcerer's apprentice and pitching himself as the only acceptable option between the radical Left and the far-right, Emmanuel Macron has allowed Rassemblement National to become a major force within the National Assembly, argues Ellen Salvi in this opinion article. Rather than fighting against the racist and xenophobic ideas of Marine Le Pen's party, she writes, he ended up giving them a helping hand out of sheer political cynicism. Following Sunday's legislative elections the far-right party will have 89 MPs in the new National Assembly.

Macron's democratic slap in the face

France— Analysis

Having been repudiated at the ballot box in the second round of France's legislative elections on Sunday, Presidential Emmanuel Macron is now faced with an unprecedented political and institutional crisis. Without a working majority in the National Assembly, there looks to be no obvious solutions for him at the start of his second term, unless there is a major but improbable realignment of political groups. Analysis by political correspondent Ilyes Ramdani.

Macron condemns Russian 'massacre' as EU leaders visit Kyiv

International— Link

French head of state was speaking in the town of Irpin while on a visit with the German, Italian and Romanian leaders to show support for Ukraine.

Macron, Scholz and Draghi arrive in Kyiv for historic visit

International— Link

The French president and other two EU leaders were greeted with air raid sirens in Ukrainian capital.

Why the 'Macronista' attack on France's leftwing alliance is cynical and antidemocratic

France— Opinion

In next Sunday's decisive second round in France's legislative elections there will be nearly sixty constituencies where candidates from the broad left alliance known as NUPES will be in a head-to-head contest with far-right candidates. Yet rather than telling its voters to back the leftwing candidates against the far-right Rassemblement National, senior figures in Emmanuel Macron's ruling party have labelled both those on the right and many on the left as extremists. And they say they will advise their voters whom to back on a case by case basis. Mediapart's Ellen Salvi argues in this opinion article that this cynical approach amounts to bad faith on the part of the president's political movement. She says it goes against both political principles and political history – and also flies in the face of everything that the president claimed to be defending in his recent presidential campaign.

Macron urges French voters to give him a 'strong majority'

France— Link

The president's Parliamentary majority is under threat after a first round of voting in legislative elections that galvanised a newly formed left-wing alliance. 

France is on 'war economy' footing says Macron

France— Link

Speaking at a weapons industry fair, French president said Europe needed 'a much larger defence industry' to avoid relying on suppliers elsewhere for its equipment needs, and called for bigger defence budgets.

Macron at risk of losing his Parliamentary majority

France— Analysis

Shortly after winning the presidential election in 2017 Emmanuel Macron won a thumping majority at elections for the National Assembly, enabling him to push through his programme of reforms. Now, two months after his re-election as president in April, the head of state has suffered his first electoral setback at a national level. In the first round of voting in legislative elections on Sunday Macron's coalition of parties attracted only a handful more votes than the united left alliance known as NUPES. Though the head of state's centre-right Ensemble alliance is well-placed to win the support of other voters in the decisive second round next Sunday June 19th, his supporters are nonetheless worried he could lose his overall majority in the National Assembly. Ilyes Ramdani reports.

A 'red rag' to voters: why some of Macron's MP candidates are dropping his campaign photo

France

Candidates standing for Emmanuel Macron's La République en Marche (LREM) party in the 2017 Parliamentary elections could not get enough of the newly-elected president's name and image on their campaign literature. It is a very different story in this year's Parliamentary elections, which are to be held over two rounds on June 12th and June 19th. A number of candidates for the ruling party and its allies have decided to campaign under their own own name rather than that of the recently re-elected president. Some candidates facing a tough battle against the Left or far-right look upon campaign photos of Macron as a “red rag” to disgruntled voters. Ellen Salvi reports.

Anger of French diplomats at Macron's 'jobs for friends' reform

France— Analysis

A reform promoting “internal mobility” has just been introduced at France's Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The ostensible aim of Emmanuel Macron's measure is to make the French senior civil service more flexible and less elitist. However, many diplomats see the American-style reforms at the ministry as a pretext to enable the head of state to appoint his political friends or business executives to plum diplomatic posts. They also think the president is settling scores with the diplomatic corps, whom the Élysée royally detests. The depth of feeling at the ministry is so strong that trade unions representing diplomats have called for a strike on June 2nd. René Backmann reports.

Macron's new government under Élisabeth Borne: same old recipe, even less novelty

France— Analysis

After a delay of 26 days, on Friday May 20th Emmanuel Macron finally appointed the 27 members of the new government under recently-installed prime minister Élisabeth Borne. As Ilyes Ramdani reports, its composition is strikingly similar to the old government and is still anchored firmly to the right. Historian Pap Ndiaye, who was a surprise appointment as minister of education, represents something of an anomaly alongside the rest of the ministerial team.