Keyword: Emmanuel Macron

France's unvaccinated hit back at Macron: 'Forcing us isn't the answer'

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A sticker on a lamppost saying no to the Covid-19 vaccine, at Montreuil in the Paris suburbs. © NB. A sticker on a lamppost saying no to the Covid-19 vaccine, at Montreuil in the Paris suburbs. © NB.

Less than a week ago President Emmanuel Macron caused controversy when he said he wanted to “piss off” the unvaccinated in France, whom he described as “irresponsible” and “no longer citizens” in his eyes. As Mediapart has found out, these comments shocked people who have not – yet – made the decision to get vaccinated against Covid. Divided between those who have doubts about the vaccine, others who are afraid, or some who simply feel that it is their duty to defend public liberties, the unvaccinated say they feel misunderstood and are unhappy about being stigmatised. Nejma Brahim reports.

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Emmanuel Macron calls for stronger EU defence strategy

EU Commission head Ursula von der Leyen agreed it was time for the EU to 'move up a gear' to become a standalone military power.

French parliament approves Macron’s vaccine pass

French MPs passed draft legislation including the vaccine pass shortly after 5am after an all-night session by a margin of 214 to 93.

The danger of Macron's decision to depict the unvaccinated as 'non-citizens'

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Emmanuel Macron at a meeting of the Defence Council to discuss the pandemic, December 27th 2021. © Nicolas Tucat/Pool/AFP Emmanuel Macron at a meeting of the Defence Council to discuss the pandemic, December 27th 2021. © Nicolas Tucat/Pool/AFP

In an interview with daily newspaper Le Parisien French president Emmanuel Macron cheerfully admitted that he wanted to “piss off” those who had chosen not to get vaccinated against Covid-19 as much as possible. The comment has made headlines around the world. But less remarked upon was his extraordinary description of anyone unvaccinated as an “irresponsible person who is no longer a citizen”. In saying this, says Mediapart's political correspondent Ellen Salvi, the head of state – the guarantor of law in the French Republic – has committed a moral, institutional and political error. In this op-ed article she argues that Emmanuel Macron is adding hysteria to the debate, dividing society and giving fresh impetus to the very people he is claiming to be combating.

Row as Macron says he wants to 'piss off' people who refuse vaccine

French head of state's remarks have been condemned by his political opponents who said the language used was "unworthy" of the presidential office.

Macron's 'out of touch' New Year's address to the nation ahead of presidential election

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Emmanuel Macron during his televised New Year's message on December 31st 2021, the last of his presidency. © Martin Bureau/AFP Emmanuel Macron during his televised New Year's message on December 31st 2021, the last of his presidency. © Martin Bureau/AFP

On Friday evening Emmanuel Macron delivered the final New Year's presidential broadcast to the nation of his five-year term of office. Ahead of April's presidential elections – for which Macron has yet to officially declare himself as a candidate – the incumbent gave a rapid overview of what he sees as his achievements in office. Despite the Covid pandemic, President Macron sought to describe a political landscape that embraced both “optimism” and “tolerance” - an assessment, says Ellen Salvi, that stands in stark contrast to the reality of his presidency. Political opponents immediately accused the president of being “out of touch”.

France removes EU flag from Arc de Triomphe after rightwing anger

Official in the French presidency says removal of flag was in line with planned schedule. 

Macron warns of 'difficult' weeks ahead but encourages 'optimism'

In his televised New Year's Eve address, the last before the next election, the French president said despite the challenges it had faced, France was stronger now than two years ago.

Macron's election balancing act on Europe

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Emmanuel Macron at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, May 9th 2021. © Photo Frédéric Florin/AFP Emmanuel Macron at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, May 9th 2021. © Photo Frédéric Florin/AFP

Emmanuel Macron has still to announce his widely expected bid for a second term in office in next April’s presidential elections. His eventual rivals accuse him of unfairly using his position to already campaign in disguise, and notably when France takes over the rotating, six-month presidency of the EU Council on January 1st. As Ellen Salvi reports, it will give Macron the opportunity of testing his election campaign arguments to win over the Eurosceptics among his potential electorate on the Right, and notably on the handling of the Covid-19 crisis and immigration controls.

Macron hails Franco-German unity after talks with Chancellor Scholz

Addressing Scholz as "dear Olaf" and using the informal "tu" pronoun in French, Macron said he welcomed the show of unity between the men at their meeting. 

French conservative candidate vows to end Macron's centrism

In her first address as the French conservatives' presidential candidate, Valérie Pécresse vowed to break with President Emmanuel Macron's centrist policies and to defeat the extremism of her far-right presidential rivals.

Recovery, power, belonging: Macron's plan for France's EU presidency

France’s aim is "to move towards a Europe that is powerful in the world, fully sovereign, free in its choices and in charge of its own destiny", Macron said. 

Macron tackles Zemmour in symbolic setting of Vichy

Far-right candidate Eric Zemmour has repeatedly spurred controversy by attempting to whitewash the extent of Marshal Philippe Pétain’s collaboration.

Right-winger Pécresse can beat Macron in election says new poll

While Pécresse would trail Macron in April's first round by 20 percent to his 23 percent, she would win a second run-off by 52 points to 48, the Elabe group survey published on Tuesday evening indicated.

Why new Omicron variant highlights the urgent need to lift vaccine patents

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The Johnson & Johnson Covid vaccine being deployed in front of a voting booth in Soweto, November 1st 2021, during local elections in South Africa. © Photo Michèle Spatari / AFP The Johnson & Johnson Covid vaccine being deployed in front of a voting booth in Soweto, November 1st 2021, during local elections in South Africa. © Photo Michèle Spatari / AFP

The emergence of the new variant of Covid-19 called Omicron should serve as a wakeup call to rich countries that unless the whole world is given access to vaccines the pandemic is doomed to continue. Instead, the new variant was given as the reason why a key meeting at the World Trade Organisation to debate the temporary lifting of intellectual property rights on vaccines was postponed indefinitely. Rozenn Le Saint reports on the anger of French activists at the lack of progress on what they see as a key issue in tacking the pandemic in poorer countries.