Keyword: François de Rugy

Truth behind former Macron minister's summer media campaign to clear his name

Ex-minister François de Rugy seeks to clear his name on BFM TV, July 29th 2019. © DR Ex-minister François de Rugy seeks to clear his name on BFM TV, July 29th 2019. © DR

A string of revelations from Mediapart about his lifestyle and use of public money led to the resignation of François de Rugy, environment minister and number two in the French government, on July 16th 2019. Since then the former minister has been on a PR offensive, helped by friends in the media, seeking to prove that his name has subsequently been “cleared” and that Mediapart's revelations had been “refuted”. This is obviously untrue. Fabrice Arfi, Michaël Hajdenberg, Antton Rouget and Marine Turchi look back over the facts of the case.

This 'hotel republic' gravy train that dishonours France

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François de Rugy leaving the environment ministry on July 17th 2019 following his resignation. © Reuters François de Rugy leaving the environment ministry on July 17th 2019 following his resignation. © Reuters

Mediapart’s revelations earlier this month of the use of public funds by French environment minister François de Rugy for his dinner parties and decorations of his grace and favour apartment led to his resignation last week. Amid accusations from some complacent quarters of a media ‘witch-hunt’, Mediapart’s publishing editor Edwy Plenel sets the record straight here: the means, the residences, the funds and the personnel of France’s institutions, he writes, do not belong to those elected representatives and members of government who are momentarily at the service of the state. By revealing the persistent lack of probity, Mediapart’s investigations are firmly in the public interest.

Internal probes confirm ex-French minister's publicly funded high life

French environment minister François de Rugy resigned on July 16th following Mediapart’s revelations of his use of public funds to host with his wife grand dinner parties with fine wines and food when he was speaker of the National Assembly, and later to redecorate his grace and favour apartment as environment minister at a cost to the public purse of more than 60,000 euros. The revelations prompted two administrative inquiries, which were published on Tuesday. Far from the claims by the ex-minister, once an outspoken campaigner for greater transparency in public office, that he has been exonerated, their findings confirm the events and amounts reported in Mediapart's investigations.

How political reality caught up with Macron over fate of his environment minister

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François de Rugy, right, with President Emmanuel Macron  and Prime Minister Édoaurd Philippe, December 10th 2018. © Reuters François de Rugy, right, with President Emmanuel Macron and Prime Minister Édoaurd Philippe, December 10th 2018. © Reuters

When the affair over environment minister François de Rugy's use of public money first broke, President Emmanuel Macron was determined to hold firm and keep his minister in government. He did not want to “give an inch” to Mediapart he was reported as saying, and initially insisted that unless and until a criminal investigation was opened his minister should stay. But in the end, because of the impact the story was having among the public, and despite the fact that there was little real prospect of legal proceedings being started, President Macron bowed to political reality – and de Rugy left the government. Ellen Salvi reports.

Revealed: former environment minister's fondness for ministerial cars

François de Rugy, the environment minister and number two in the government who quit on Tuesday July 16th after revelations about his lifestyle and use of public money, employed ministerial chauffeur-driven cars for his own personal use, Mediapart can reveal. Several former government ministers have raised questions over de Rugy's apparently excessive use of such vehicles. Michel Deléan, Michaël Hajdenberg, Antton Rouget and Marine Turchi report.

Élisabeth Borne to replace François de Rugy as environment minister

Transport minister replaces de Rugy who quit after a week of reports by Mediapart about his high spending on private dinners and renovations of his ministerial residence.

French minister François de Rugy quits after revelations about lifestyle and expenses

Environment minister François de Rugy has resigned from the government. © Reuters Environment minister François de Rugy has resigned from the government. © Reuters

François de Rugy, the environment minister and number two in President Emmanuel Macron's government behind prime minister Édouard Philippe, resigned on Tuesday 16 July following a string of revelations by Mediapart about his lifestyle as a minister, including grand dinners paid for out of the public purse. De Rugy quit just as Mediapart was about to make fresh revelations about his use of expenses as an MP. Michaël Hajdenberg, Antton Rouget and Fabrice Arfi report.

How French minister and probity advocate enjoys the high life on public funds

French environment minister François de Rugy and his wife Séverine. © Reuters French environment minister François de Rugy and his wife Séverine. © Reuters

French environment minister François de Rugy, an outspoken campaigner for greater transparency in public office, is engulfed this week by Mediapart’s revelations of how he and his wife regularly organised grand dinner parties with fine wines and food provided for by the public purse, while also ordering the redecoration of their ministerial grace and favour apartment at a cost of more than 60,000 euros also paid for by public funds. His chief of staff has now been forced to resign after Mediapart also revealed this week how for 12 years she held on to an apartment allocated to her on subsidised rent by the Paris social housing department when she was in fact posted elsewhere in the country.

The divisions behind the latest 'gilets jaunes' social protests in Paris

Scenes from the first 'gilets jaunes' protests in Paris, November 17th, 2018. © E.S. Scenes from the first 'gilets jaunes' protests in Paris, November 17th, 2018. © E.S.

This Saturday December 1st the so-called 'gilets jaunes' or yellow hi-vis vest protesters will take to the streets of central Paris for the third weekend in a row. This time other groups – unions, anti-racist movements and student groups – are also planning demonstrations in the capital. But while they might all be demonstrating at the same time, these different components of the current social movement sweeping across France are not all on the same wavelength when it comes to their aims and objectives. Mathilde Goanec, Dan Israel and Faïza Zerouala report.

Macron names new environment minister in reshuffle

François de Rugy chosen to replace high-profile minister Nicolas Hulot who quit live on TV; a new sports minister has also been named.

 

French minister quits in fresh blow to President Macron

Popular sports minister Laura Flessel, a former Olympic fencing champion, steps down for personal reasons as president's ratings hit new lows.

French Green defections continue as divided Socialists hold summer conference

Departure of EELV's Senate leader Jean-Vincent Placé follows decision by a senior MP to quit the environmental party.

Senior MP quits 'ultra-left' French Greens

François de Rugy, a long-time supporter of an alliance with the ruling Socialist Party, said the EELV party had moved too far to the left.