Keyword: François Fillon

New Fillon claim: was key campaign aide paid by billionaire for 'fake work'?

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Friend of François Fillon: billionaire Marc Ladreit de Lacharrière at the Élysée on July 11th, 2016. © Reuters Friend of François Fillon: billionaire Marc Ladreit de Lacharrière at the Élysée on July 11th, 2016. © Reuters

Right-wing François Fillon's presidential campaign has been thrown into turmoil after claims that his wife Penelope was paid €500,000  as his parliamentary assistant despite doubts she ever performed that role. It is also claimed that Penelope Fillon received €100,000 from a magazine owned by a billionaire ally of former prime minister Fillon, even though she appears to have done little work for it. The couple have been questioned by investigators, while new claims emerge that the family may have pocketed close to a million euros in all. Now Mediapart can reveal that a key advisor on Fillon's election campaign was given a job at a charitable foundation run by the same billionaire, Marc Ladreit de Lacharrière, at the time she began working for the presidential candidate. Yet there is no public trace of the advisor's work at the foundation. Antton Rouget investigates a case that will raise yet more questions surrounding the finances of the frontrunner to be the next French president.

François Fillon and wife Penelope quizzed in 'fake job' probe

Right-wing presidential hopeful and wife being questioned separately by investigators over claims that Penelope Fillon was paid for fake jobs.

France's Fillon loses ground to centrist Macron, polls show

Independent candidate Emmanuel Macron is now neck-and-neck with right winger Fillon in race to the Elysée, according to polls.

Presidential hopeful Fillon fails to shake off graft claims

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François Fillon. François Fillon.

François Fillon, the presidential election candidate for the French conservative party Les Républicains, appeared on French television on Thursday evening in an attempt to contain the scandal caused by press revelations this week that his wife was paid 500,000 euros from MPs’ funds to act as his parliamentary assistant, a role which, it is alleged, she did not fulfil. Fillon, who was just one month ago regarded as the presidential election frontrunner, denounced the "abject nature of these accusations” but failed to provide clear evidence that his wife Penelope carried out the job she was paid for, while he also admitted to having employed two of his children when he was a senator. Ellen Salvi reports.

French presidential candidate Fillon on the ropes over wife's payments

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François Fillon. François Fillon.

Former French prime minister François Fillon, presidential candidate of the conservative Les Républicains party and widely tipped as the frontrunner in the elections, was this week fighting for his political survival following press revelations that his British-born wife Penelope was paid a total of 500,000 euros out of MPs’ funds to act as his parliamentary assistant, and which cast doubt about whether she actually fulfilled the role. It also emerges that she was paid about 100,000 euros between 2012 and 2013 by a magazine owned by a wealthy Fillon ally. The public prosecutor’s office has now opened an investigation into suspected “misappropriation of public funds” and “misuse of company assets”. Mathilde Mathieu reports on the background to a scandal that not only threatens Fillon’s future, but which could also radically affect the outcome of the presidential elections.  

French prosecutors open probe into Fillon wife 'fake job' report

Public prosecutors on Wednesday announced an investigation into suspected 'misappropriation of public funds' just hours after weekly magazine Le Canard Enchaîné revealed that the wife of former PM François Fillon, now conservative candidate for the presidency, was paid 500,000 euros over eight years as his parliamentary assistant.

French presidential favourite paid wife from parliamentary funds

Former prime minister and now conservative presidential election candidate François Fillon is under increasing pressure to prove that his British-born wife Penelope did actually complete work as a parliamentary assistant to him for which, reported weekly Le Canard Enchaîné, she was paid a total of 500,000 euros from parliamentary funds.

French presidential candidate Fillon to propose immigration quotas

Right-wing favourite to win race for Elysée will also urge EU to tighten asylum and immigration policy to counter threat of Islamist militants.

Poll finds Macron 'most popular' French politician

As campaigning for next year's presidential elections approaches, an opinion survey finds centrist former economy minister Emmanuel Macron is most popular of French politicians, ahead of conservative presidential candidate François Fillon.

Fall of Aleppo reveals fault lines in French politics

The end of the battle for Syria's second city and the plight of its civilians have drawn different responses from across France's political spectrum. On the Right the line taken by conservative presidential candidate François Fillon has been close to that of the far-right Front National, with his defence of the Assad regime and Vladimir Putin. The ruling Socialist Party and the Greens have emphasised their support for Syria's opposition, while the radical left presidential candidate Jean-Luc Mélenchon has adopted an anti-imperialist stance, with the United States as his main target. Lénaïg Bredoux, Lucie Delaporte and Christophe Gueugneau report.

Why Fillon's win has thrown down the gauntlet to the entire French Left

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The crushing win in Sunday's conservative primary by former prime minister François Fillon shows that the French Right is not worried about its electoral opponents, writes Mediapart's Hubert Huertas. In choosing the most hardline candidate with the most radical austerity programme since the end of World War II, right-wing voters have delivered a message of supreme confidence. As far as they are concerned, it is as if left-wing opposition no longer exists. So how, he asks, will the French Left respond?

France's ruling socialists scramble to avoid split after Fillon win

After PM Valls initially suggested he might quit and stand against President Hollande in party primary, he later said he would stay in his job.

François Fillon wins sweeping victory to become conservative candidate in French presidential election

Crushing win: former prime minister François Fillon will be the Right's candidate in next year's presidential election. Crushing win: former prime minister François Fillon will be the Right's candidate in next year's presidential election.

François Fillon will be the conservative candidate in the 2017 presidential election after a crushing victory over his rival Alain Juppé in this Sunday's primary election run-off. With most of the votes declared, the former prime minister has picked up two-thirds of the vote. This emphatic win on the back of a turnout of well over four million voters will give Fillon a huge springboard for next spring's presidential elections. For months Fillon languished in the polls, far behind his former boss Nicolas Sarkozy and the pollsters' favourite Juppé, the 71-year-old mayor of Bordeaux. But in the final days before last week's first round in the primary Fillon's support suddenly surged and he won that contest with more than 44% of the vote. This Sunday's stunning victory has confirmed that surge. In his victory speech Fillon said: “If in 2017 we take things firmly in hand then our country will go far, for nothing can get in the way of a people who want to take their future in their hands.” But the 62-year-old faces tough questions ahead about his radical programme for government. These will likely focus on three main areas: his social conservatism, his economic liberalism – including his plan to axe half a million public sector posts – and his foreign policy and in particular his desire for closer relations with Russia. Nonetheless Fillon now stands a good chance of being France's next head of state, given the splits and divisions on the Left and the unlikelihood that France will ultimately vote for the far-right Front National's Marine Le Pen to be President of the Republic next May. Follow the results and reactions in this crucial primary election here.

France votes for centre-right candidate - and perhaps next president

Opinion polls show François Fillon, a social conservative, as the clear favourite after he easily eclipsed his centrist rival Alain Juppé last week.

Fillon attacks 'Paris elite' before second-round primary vote

Right-wing ex-PM who came from behind and is now favourite to win on Sunday dismisses ‘tiny microcosm who think they know everything'.