Keyword: génocide

Rwanda seeks extradition from France of genocide suspect uncovered by Mediapart

By Théo Englebert
Left to right: an undated photo of Aloys Ntiwiragabo, and pictured on his way to church in February 2020 in Orléans. © DR Left to right: an undated photo of Aloys Ntiwiragabo, and pictured on his way to church in February 2020 in Orléans. © DR

The Rwandan authorities have issued an international warrant for the arrest and extradition of Aloys Ntiwiragabo, a former head of the country’s military intelligence who is accused of playing a key role in the 1994 genocide in which an estimated 800,000 people were slaughtered, after an investigation by Mediapart revealed that he had settled with his wife in the French town of Orléans.

Rwandan genocide suspect Aloys Ntiwiragabo 'has lived in France for 14 years'

By Théo Englebert
An undated photo of Aloys Ntiwiragabo from a report by NGO African Rights. An undated photo of Aloys Ntiwiragabo from a report by NGO African Rights.

In July Mediapart revealed that Rwandan colonel Aloys Ntiwiragabo, who is suspected of playing an important role in the 1994 genocide against the Tutsis, was now living in Orléans in France. Now we can reveal that the former head of Rwandan military intelligence has been living here for at least 14 years. Yet, curiously, paperwork acknowledging his request for political asylum in France was only sent to him in February 2020. The fact that his asylum application has only been made recently raises questions about what Aloys Ntiwiragabo's status had been in the meantime - and whether he had received discreet support. Théo Englebert reports.

 

How Mediapart tracked down Rwandan genocide suspect Aloys Ntiwiragabo in France

By Théo Englebert
On the left, an undated photo of Aloys Ntiwiragabo ; on the right, photographed in February 2020. © DR On the left, an undated photo of Aloys Ntiwiragabo ; on the right, photographed in February 2020. © DR

France's anti-terrorism prosecution authorities have opened a preliminary investigation for 'crimes against humanity' into Aloys Ntiwiragabo after Mediapart revealed that he was living in a quiet suburb of Orléans, a city 75 miles south-west of Paris. There had been an international search for the former head of military intelligence over his suspected role in the massacre of the Tutsis in Rwanda in 1994. Aloys Ntiwiragabo, now 72, also founded and led a criminal armed group, the Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda, which has been blamed for attacks in central Africa. But the Rwandan fugitive disappeared off the radar until Mediapart tracked him down. There are now questions over how France could have allowed him to enter the country and live here undetected. Théo Englebert reports.

'Financier' of Rwandan genocide arrested in Paris suburb

Félicien Kabuga, 84, who is accused of funding and encouraging the genocide of 800,000 people, mostly Tutsis in Rwanda in 1994, and who was was indicted by the UN international criminal tribunal for Rwanda in 1997 for genocide and six other counts, was arrested on Saturday in the Paris suburb of Asnières where he had been living under a false identity.

Rwanda genocide: Macron orders probe of France's role

Rwanda accuses France of complicity in mass killings - a charge denied by Paris  - and experts will now consult archives to analyse France's role.

Revealed: France's lies over the genocide in Rwanda

By and Benoît Collombat (Radio France)
The wreckage of Rwandan president Juvénal Habyarimana's aicraft, shot down on April 6th 1994. © Reuters The wreckage of Rwandan president Juvénal Habyarimana's aicraft, shot down on April 6th 1994. © Reuters

In a joint investigation, Mediapart and Radio France have revealed the contents of previously unseen documents relating to aspects of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, from the assassination of President Juvénal Habyarimana which sparked the massacres to illegal arms sales to the genocidal regime. The documents include a key report by France's overseas intelligence agency, the DGSE, on the genocide, which left close to one million people dead. Mediapart's Fabrice Arfi and Benoît Collombat of Radio France report.

The French Army and genocide in Rwanda: a damning video

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On the right, Colonel Jacques Rosier, head of French special forces in Rwanda. © DR On the right, Colonel Jacques Rosier, head of French special forces in Rwanda. © DR

Mediapart has published a video filmed in the summer of 1994 by French soldiers in Rwanda. It exposes the passivity of the army during one of the most embarrassing episodes for France during the genocide in that country: the massacre at Bisesero. The revelation comes as French judges complete their long investigation into the claims that the French military was "complicit" in genocide and crimes against humanity. Meanwhile human rights groups say they fear that the victims of the atrocities will be denied justice.  Fabrice Arfi reports.

France closes probe into plane attack that sparked Rwanda genocide

An investigation into the deadly missile attack in 1994 on the aircraft carrying Rwandan president Juvenal Habyarimana, after which followed 100 days of slaughter of the Tutsi ethnic minority by members of Habyarimana's Hutu ethnic group, leaving an estimated 800,000 people dead, has been closed by French magistrates.

Rwanda accuses 22 French officers of genocide

Officials claim French officers were involved both as perpetrators and accomplices in 1994 genocide in which more than 800,000 were killed.

French court jails two Rwandan mayors for life for genocide

Court said Octavien Ngenzi, 58, and Tito Barahira, 64, were guilty of  'crimes against humanity' during country's 1994 genocide.

French court 'drops genocide case against Rwandan priest'

France-based Wenceslas Munyeshyaka was suspected of an active role in the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, where he received a life sentence in 2006.

French president says Turkey should recognise Armenian genocide

François Hollande was speaking at ceremony in Armenia's capital Yerevan to mark 100 years since mass killings of roughly 1.5 million people.

France partly declassifies Rwanda archives, but key files stay secret

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Le mémorial de Bisesero, Rwanda, février 2014 © Thomas Cantaloube Le mémorial de Bisesero, Rwanda, février 2014 © Thomas Cantaloube

Earlier this week it was announced that hitherto secret French presidential archives relating to the 1994 Rwanda genocide were to be declassified. The documents are records from the presidency of the late François Mitterrand, and cover France’s close relations with the Rwandan regime of president Juvénal Habyarimana, whose assassination 21 years ago sparked the state-sponsored massacres that claimed the lives of more than 800,000 people. France’s role before and during the genocide remains controversial, amid speculation that it provided weapons support and protection of those who perpetrated the slaughter. But, writes Mediapart’s international affairs correspondent Thomas Cantaloube, while the move this week to declassify Mitterrand’s archives appeared to be one of belated transparency, they promise few revelations beyond previous leaks, while the key archives about France’s involvement in Rwanda held by the defence and foreign affairs ministries remain strictly secret.

France declassifies Rwanda genocide archives

The hitherto secret files relating to the 1994 genocide of 800,000 people include advice given to then French president François Mitterrand.

Rwanda: the dishonour of France

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The French government pulled out of the commemorations on Monday April 7th that marked the twentieth anniversary of the Rwandan genocide. This abrupt decision was provoked by the recent comments of Rwandan president Paul Kagamé about “the direct role of Belgium and France in the political preparation of the genocide, and the participation of the latter in its actual execution”, remarks which have sparked outrage in France. But though France's reaction was in line with former foreign minister Alain Juppé's demand that the government should “defend France's honour”, Mediapart's Editor-in-Chief Edwy Plenel argues that the decision not to attend the commemorations is instead a sign of France's dishonour over the tragic affair.