Keyword: immigration

The 'culture of violence and resentment' that fuels French jihadists

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 © Reuters © Reuters

The shooting attacks in Paris last week claimed the lives of a total of 17 victims and ended with the deaths of the three gunmen. The outrages, perpetrated by Islamic extremists and which began with the massacre at the offices of Charlie Hebdo magazine before the separate murders of two police officers and the executions of four hostages in a Jewish supermarket, have opened a vast societal debate in France. There have been comparisons made with the 9/11 attacks in the United States, questions raised about the true significance of the national unity displayed during last Sunday’s huge marches in defiance of terrorism, about the real extent of integration, and stigmatization, of the French Muslim population, and why the jihad increasingly lures some young French citizens. In this interview with Joseph Confavreux, Olivier Roy, a recognised expert in France and abroad on questions of Islam and religious fundamentalism, discusses these and related issues, and highlights the taboos that cloud an effective analysis of the events.

After Charlie Hebdo attack in France, backlash against Muslims feared

With tension building, Muslim leaders advised veiled women to avoid going out alone and urged members to join in national minute of silence.

French immigrants find Canada the land of opportunity

Since the economic meltdown six years ago French immigration to Canada has exploded, with 34,619 new residents between 2008 and 2012.

Jean-Marie Le Pen says Ebola virus 'can solve immigration problems'

At a meeting in Marseille, the founder of France's far-right Front National party said the virus could save France from 'submersion'.

Does immigration mean ‘France is over’?

American philosopher Justin E H Smith, who is teaching at a French university, explores the impact of immigration on France and its identity.

European citizenship for sale - only the wealthy need apply

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While the European Union is placing increased resources into blocking clandestine immigration to the continent, its member states, notably those of the south, worst-hit by the financial crisis, are mounting schemes to sell residency rights and even citizenship to wealthy non-EU foreigners in an attempt to attract millions of euros into state coffers. To qualify for most of the schemes it suffices to buy into luxury property, a deal which is notably attracting Russian, Chinese and Middle East investors. The European Commission, meanwhile, says it has no say in the cynical and apparently legal business of selling European citizenship. Ludovic Lamant reports.

Fast-track court judging immigration cases opens at Roissy airport

The controversial new court set up at Charles de Gaulle airport began hearings this week, with the first defendant ordered to return to Senegal.

French interior minister's immigration comments spark outrage

Manuel Valls is once again at the centre of controversy after calling France's immigration policy and its relationship to Islam into question.

France moves to catch up lost ground in the race for foreign talent

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Earlier this week the French Senate held the first of two parliamentary consultative debates to explore how to make France a more attractive destination for skilled foreign professionals and students, an issue that has long been neglected and submerged under the anti-immigration policies and political rhetoric of the government’s predecessors. In a move to catch up with initiatives launched by other countries, the government plans to present a bill of law this summer to reform its immigration legislation to attempt to facilitate and encourage professional immigration. Carine Fouteau reports on how what was once a political taboo is now the subject of an open and aggressive competition for an ever-growing and increasingly-needed pool of talent worldwide.

Revealed: The real story about French Muslims, immigration and radicalisation

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Islam is the second religion in France yet Muslims often feel discriminated against and misunderstood. And because the French state outlaws the gathering of data on religious or ethnic grounds it is difficult to know exactly how Muslims view their faith, how many are being radicalised – or even how many Muslims there are in the country. Here Mediapart publishes the results of a major new study attempting to overcome this lack of data. It confirms that a small proportion of Muslim youths are being radicalised. But it also shows how the way in which they are depicted in society has led to an increased religious sentiment among Muslims anxious to assert their identity. Carine Fouteau reports.

Élections: les Français d'origine étrangère votent autant que les autres

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Dans une étude publiée ce jeudi, l'Insee révèle que les Français d'origine étrangère s'inscrivent moins souvent que les autres sur les listes électorales, mais qu'une fois accomplies les démarches ils se prononcent tout autant. 

Mussie Zerai, l’ange gardien de ceux qui tentent de traverser la Méditerranée

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Mussie Zerai est un prêtre érythréen hors du commun. Les migrants qui traversent la Méditerranée ont son numéro de téléphone portable. En cas de naufrage, c'est lui qu'ils appellent au secours et qui alerte les garde-côtes italiens ou maltais. Ces dernières semaines, il reçoit aussi des SOS du désert du Sinaï où ses compatriotes sont pris en otages.

François Hollande promises to curb foreign workers

Presidential election favourite says he will control the number of foreigners allowed to work in France in a time of economic crisis.

France threatens to pull out of Europe’s borderless travel zone

French government says if the EU didn’t back its tougher line on illegal immigration it would lead to the end of Europe's borderless travel zone.

A myth-exploding history of black France

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A major work just published in France charts the rich and very diverse history of the country's black population from the late 17th century to current times. "We wanted to make this history a visible one, with all the markers of grand history", explains historian Pascal Blanchard, editor of La France noire, trois siècles de présence, (‘Black France, a presence over three centuries'). The book blows away many social myths, and fills the deafening silence of traditional teaching that ignores the place of black people in the making of the history of France. Here, Blanchard tells Joseph Confavreux how he and his team approached this ambitious project and comments for Mediapart a series of documents contained in the work.