Keyword: Manuel Valls

French PM demands cardinal 'take responsibility' in paedophile case

Cardinal Philippe Barbarin is accused of covering up actions of Lyon priest suspected of sexually abusing boy Scouts between 1986 and 1991.

Why President Hollande fears France's students

What French governments fear: when students take to the streets. © Reuters What French governments fear: when students take to the streets. © Reuters

A total of 20 student and youth organisations have called for protests on Wednesday, March 9th against the government's proposed reforms of employment law. Though the formal presentation of the bill has now been postponed pending further discussions with trade unions, ministers still fear the spectre of widespread social mobilisation, of the kind seen ten years ago that sank plans for new workplace contracts. In particular, President François Hollande is afraid the final months of his presidency would be doomed if students take to the streets in large numbers. Lénaïg Bredoux and Faïza Zerouala report on the unpredictability of France's student protests.

French PM to push ahead with labour reform

However, Manuel Valls promised 'improvements' to controversial bill which as it stands would make it easier for companies to lay off workers.

French labour law reform: anatomy of a political fiasco

Facing the storm: employment minister Myriam El Khomri and prime minister Manuel Valls. © Reuters Facing the storm: employment minister Myriam El Khomri and prime minister Manuel Valls. © Reuters

On Monday February 29th the prime minister Manuel Valls announced that the government was postponing for two weeks the formal presentation of a new bill reforming employment law. This concession came after days of vociferous opposition to the bill from trade unions, students and many members of France's ruling Socialist Party itself who see the measure as an attack on workers' rights. Mediapart's Lénaïg Bredoux, Rachida El Azzouzi, Mathilde Goanec and Mathieu Magnaudeix analyse how what was intended to be a flagship government reform went so badly wrong.

France's Hollande under fire as Socialists face electoral meltdown

Many in Hollande’s own party have made it clear they want someone else to run for president in next year's election.

France delays unveiling controversial labour law reform

Move by premier Manuel Valls follows angry reactions from unions, students and members of his own Socialist Party over planned reforms.

French socialists face rift after ex-leader attacks Hollande

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Martine Aubry on the warpath, seen here with current party boss Jean-Christophe Cambadélis. Martine Aubry on the warpath, seen here with current party boss Jean-Christophe Cambadélis.

The former first secretary of the French Socialist Party (PS), Martine Aubry, has launched a ferocious attack on the policies of President François Hollande and his prime minister Manuel Valls. Her trenchant comments in an article in Le Monde – seen by some as a call by Hollande to ditch his prime minister - in turn led to bitter criticism of her stance from government loyalists. It remains unclear where Aubry's initiative will lead. But as Mediapart's Stéphane Alliès reports, it looks as if support for the socialist government could now be in a minority within the Socialist Party itself.

French PM rejects permanent European quota for refugees

Manuel Valls said France, which has pledged to take 30,000 of the 160,000 refugees to be absorbed by European countries, 'won't take any more'.

The triple menace of Hollande's reform of the French constitution

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French MPs this week voted in favour of the government’s proposed reforms of France’s constitution, which include enshrining into fundamental law state of emergency powers and the stripping of French nationality from convicted terrorists. The highly controversial bill will next month be debated by the Senate, and must finally be presented to an extraordinary ‘Congress’ meeting of both houses. Mediapart editor François Bonnet argues here that the proposed reform of the constitution carries a triple menace that threatens the heart of French democracy, the future of the socialist party, and also President François Hollande's ambition to gain a second term of office.

French PM calls on Brussels to increase support for farmers

Amid increasing protests by French farmers Manuel Valls says EU has 'done too little, too late' in response to downturn in agricultural markets.

French PM defends state of emergency extension and new powers

Manuel Valls spoke as French MPs start to debate controversial plans to strip French citizenship from people convicted of terrorism.

How plan to remove French nationality has become a farce

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Caught in their own trap? President François Hollande and prime minister Manuel Valls. Caught in their own trap? President François Hollande and prime minister Manuel Valls.

On Friday February 5th, 2016, the National Assembly began debating plans to alter the French Constitution, including adding the power to strip convicted terrorists of their French nationality. It was supposed to be President François Hollande's grand response to the Paris terror attacks of 2015. Instead, amid general confusion, the government has become bogged down and endlessly changed its mind over the issue. To the point, argues Mediapart's Mathieu Magnaudeix, where the entire affair has become a national farce.

France and Belgium to step up counter-terrorism cooperation

Both countries want to boost intelligence-sharing and French source says justice ministry will send official to Belgium for important cases.

Christiane Taubira quits: the last left-winger in the French government has now gone

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Gone: left-wing justice minister Christiane Taubira. Gone: left-wing justice minister Christiane Taubira.

Justice minister Christiane Taubira quit the French government on Wednesday January 27th over her opposition to controversial plans to strip dual nationals of their French citizenship if they are convicted of terrorism. To the last this iconic figure on the left of French politics showed her flamboyance, Tweeting that “sometimes resisting means going” and later declaring: “I leave the government over a major political disagreement.” As Mediapart's political correspondent Lénaïg Bredoux reports, her replacement as justice minister by Jean-Jacques Urvoas, a close ally of prime minister Manuel Valls, is the final step by this government towards the liberal and security-based political line that President François Hollande has been seeking.

France set for 'de facto' end to 35-hour working week

After new report written on workplace reforms, prime minister Valls says 'exceptions' to 35-hour rule should not be seen as 'transgressions'.