Keyword: Marc Trévidic

French 'Karachi Affair' judges unlock official secrecy laws in legal first

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Evidence sought by Paris-based judges leading a highly sensitive judicial investigation into the murders of 11 French naval engineers in Pakistan in 2002, which has exposed a major political corruption scandal in France, has for years been held back by France’s laws protecting defence and security secrecy. The persistent refusal to hand over intelligence documents and the silence of several key witnesses has heightened speculation of an orchestrated cover up to protect political and diplomatic interests. But, Mediapart has learnt, judges Marc Trévedic and Laurence Le Vert have now found a legal loophole with which to overcome the blanket protection of a law too often used to blunt investigations. The breakthrough may at last reveal the truth hidden behind 'The Karachi Affair', a dark and complex case that has rocked France’s political establishment. Fabrice Arfi reports.

Investigators arrive in Algeria to probe 1996 murder of seven French monks

Judge Marc Trévidic and his team will oversee exhumation of the monks' heads, buried at their monastery in Tibhirine, 80km south of Algiers.

European security services 'overwhelmed' by return of Syrian jihadists

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Interpellation par la DGSI et le raid de sept jeunes strasbouregois de retrou de Syrie le 13 mai 2014 à la Meinau © Reuters Interpellation par la DGSI et le raid de sept jeunes strasbouregois de retrou de Syrie le 13 mai 2014 à la Meinau © Reuters

The recent arrest of a French citizen accused of a murderous attack at a Jewish museum in Belgium has highlighted the growing problem of jihadists returning from Syria to wage war in their own countries. More than 2,000 European citizens, including 630 French residents, have gone to fight against the Assad regime since 2011, according to recent figures. And some, at least, of those who return come back intending to use their combat training to carry out terrorists attacks at home. As Louise Fessard reports, the numbers involved are so great that European security forces, including those in France, are struggling to cope.