Keyword: Muammar Gaddafi

How Sarkozy helped key figure in election funding scandal flee Libya

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Nicolas Sarkozy, Bachir Saleh et Alexandre Djouhri © Reuters et DR Nicolas Sarkozy, Bachir Saleh et Alexandre Djouhri © Reuters et DR

Declassified reports from France's foreign intelligence service show how President Nicolas Sarkozy helped a senior figure in the Gaddafi regime escape from war-torn Libya in 2011, Mediapart can reveal. They show that Muammar Gaddafi's ex-chief of staff Bashir Saleh was taken to France in November 2011 with the aid of the French presidency and businessman Alexandre Djouhri. However, Saleh later fled France after Mediapart published details of a letter addressed to him outlining the Gaddafi regime's agreement to fund Nicolas Sarkozy’s 2007 election campaign. Fabrice Arfi and Karl Laske report.

How Gaddafi's banker in Sarkozy funding allegations was smuggled out of France

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Claude Guéant, Bernard Squarcini, Bachir Saleh et Alexandre Djouhri Claude Guéant, Bernard Squarcini, Bachir Saleh et Alexandre Djouhri

In April 2012, Mediapart revealed a document recovered from the archives of the toppled regime of late Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi detailing its agreement to fund Nicolas Sarkozy’s 2007 presidential election campaign. The letter, signed by Gaddafi’s intelligence chief Moussa Koussa, was addressed to Bashir Saleh, head of the regime’s multi-billion-dollar Libyan African Portfolio investment fund. Following the collapse of the Gaddafi regime, Saleh found asylum in France. But after Mediapart’s report, and while he was the object of an Interpol ‘wanted’ for his arrest and extradition back to Libya where he faced fraud charges, Saleh subsequently fled to South Africa. Mediapart can reveal how French magistrates have established that Saleh’s last-minute flight on May 3rd 2012 was organised by Alexandre Djouhri, a businessman close to Sarkozy’s longstanding chief of staff Claude Guéant. But also present when the two men met in the shadows of the Eiffel Tower in the early evening of that same day was Sarkozy’s domestic intelligence chief, Bernard Squarcini. Karl Laske and Fabrice Arfi report.

Top Sarkozy aide faces probe over Libyan election funding claims

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Claude Guéant, Mouammar Kadhafi et Nicolas Sarkozy à Tripoli, en 2007. © Reuters Claude Guéant, Mouammar Kadhafi et Nicolas Sarkozy à Tripoli, en 2007. © Reuters

In a dramatic development Claude Guéant, ex-chief of staff to President Nicolas Sarkozy and a former interior minister, has been placed under formal investigation for “laundering of the proceeds of tax fraud as part of an organised gang”, “forgery” and “use of false instruments” in connection with the probe into claims that the late Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi illegally funded Sarkozy's successful 2007 presidential election campaign. Investigators want to know the origin of more than 500,000 euros that was transferred into his bank account in 2008 and part of which he later used to buy a flat in Paris. Experts in the art world have cast doubt on Guéant's explanation that the money came from the sale of two paintings by 17th century Dutch artist Andries Van Eertvelt.

Sarkozy-Gaddafi funding scandal: the stifled truth

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 © Reuters © Reuters

On November 14th, Mediapart revealed that a judicial investigation had authenticated key evidence that the regime of late Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi had agreed to secretly finance the 2007 election campaign of former French president Nicolas Sarkozy. Yet this information of important public interest has remained ignored by French news agencies and rolling news broadcasters. To stifle news it suffices to not report it, writes Mediapart editor-in-chief Edwy Plenel. He explains here why this website has now decided to publish in full the contents of the judicial report which confirms as genuine an official Libyan document detailing the plans for the funding scam - and which was first published by Mediapart in 2012.

Graphologists confirm Gaddafi-Sarkozy illegal funding document is genuine

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25 juillet 2007. Claude Guéant (à gauche) et Nicolas Sarkozy retrouvent le colonel Kadhafi à Tripoli. © Reuters 25 juillet 2007. Claude Guéant (à gauche) et Nicolas Sarkozy retrouvent le colonel Kadhafi à Tripoli. © Reuters

Graphology experts assigned by a French judicial investigation to determine the authenticity of the signature on a document published by Mediapart detailing the Gaddafi regime’s approval of payment of 50 million euros to back Nicolas Sarkozy's 2007 presidential election campaign have unanimously concluded that it is indeed that of Moussa Koussa, head of the Libyan foreign intelligence services and later the dictator’s foreign affairs minister. The finding is a crucial new development in the investigation which has now gathered testimony from numerous experts backing the authenticity of the document. Fabrice Arfi and Karl Laske report.

When Sarkozy met Gaddafi: how the Libyan election funding saga began

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Nicolas Sarkozy et Mouammar Kadhafi sur le perron de l'Elysée, en 2007.  © Reuters Nicolas Sarkozy et Mouammar Kadhafi sur le perron de l'Elysée, en 2007. © Reuters

The story of the covert Libyan funding of Nicolas Sarkozy's 2007 election campaign started two years earlier with a meeting between Colonel Muammar Gaddafi and the then presidential hopeful Sarkozy himself, Mediapart can reveal. According to arms dealer Ziad Takieddine, who was in Tripoli at the time, Sarkozy directly asked Gaddafi for financial help during an official visit to the North African country in October 2005. A short time later Sarkozy's close political friend and ally Brice Hortefeux made a visit to Tripoli in which he had an off-diary meeting with Gadaffi's security chief Abdullah Senussi, a key figure in the corruption allegations involving Libya and France. Judges investigating the Libyan funding of Sarkozy's campaign are now painstakingly piecing together the background to the affair. Fabrice Arfi and Karl Laske report.

Gaddafi funding of Sarkozy campaign: the expert testimony that backs Mediapart evidence

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Dans la cour de l'Elysée en décembre 2007.  © Reuters Dans la cour de l'Elysée en décembre 2007. © Reuters

In April 2012, Mediapart published an official Libyan document that revealed that the regime of the late Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi approved payment of 50 million euros to fund Nicolas Sarkozy's successful 2007 presidential election campaign. The publication of the document prompted the opening of a judicial investigation into the claims that Gaddafi illegally financed Sarkozy’s campaign, and the ongoing probe represents a major threat to the former president who this month announced his return to active politics. “About Libya, the judges know that the documents are false,” said Sarkozy in an interview published last weekend. But in fact, as Fabrice Arfi and Karl Laske report, the magistrates leading the investigation have collected statements from numerous experts whose testimony gives credence to the document published by Mediapart.

'Is he loyal to us?': phone tap shows ex-president Sarkozy's doubts over current French spy chief

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Dans la cour de l'Elysée en décembre 2007. © Reuters Dans la cour de l'Elysée en décembre 2007. © Reuters

Mediapart can disclose the content of more phone taps concerning former president Nicolas Sarkozy that show how he and his entourage have sought to glean information on the state of judicial probes from senior state officials. One conversation reveals that the ex-head of state was worried about the “loyalty” of the new head of France's domestic intelligence service, from whom he was trying to extract key details. Judges investigating the Libyan funding of Sarkozy's 2007 presidential campaign also believe they may have uncovered the identity of one of the former president's “moles” in the intelligence services. As Fabrice Arfi reports, the revelations provide further evidence about how far Nicolas Sarkozy and his aides seem willing to go in order to find out how judicial investigations are progressing.

Senior French ambassador: 'I was told about Libyan funding of Sarkozy campaign'

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MM. Sarkozy et Kadhafi, en 2007, à l'Elysée.  © Reuters MM. Sarkozy et Kadhafi, en 2007, à l'Elysée. © Reuters

François Gouyette, who is now ambassador to Tunisia but was France's man in Libya from 2008 to 2011, has revealed to judges that two different well-placed Libyans told him that there had “indeed” been funding by Muammar Gaddafi's regime of Nicolas Sarkozy's successful bid to become French president in 2007. The fluent Arabic speaker also told the investigating magistrates that the Libyan document published by Mediapart in April 2012 revealing the illicit funding looks genuine. His intervention follows a whole string of senior figures from Libya, both friends and foes of the late Gaddafi, who have confirmed that the financing of the Sarkozy election campaign took place. Fabrice Arfi and Karl Laske report.

Sarkozy and top French magistrate in conspiracy scandal sparked by phone taps

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A judicial investigation has been opened into evidence obtained via police phone taps that Nicolas Sarkozy and his lawyer Thierry Herzog received highly confidential information from a senior French magistrate about two legal cases involving the former French president. In exchange for the illicitly-gained information, Sarkozy was allegedly asked to use his influence to obtain the appointment of the the magistrate, Gilbert Azibert, to a lucrative retirement post on Monaco’s state council. Michel Deléan reports on the latest developments in an affair that has rocked France’s political and judicial establishment and which may announce the end of Sarkozy’s planned return to politics.

Leading Gaddafi opponent confirms Libya paid 50 million euros to Sarkozy campaign

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Mohamed el-Megaryef © Reuters Mohamed el-Megaryef © Reuters

A prominent Libyan dissident who became his country's first head of state after the fall of Muammar Gaddafi in 2011 has confirmed that the dictator’s regime paid millions of euros to support Nicolas Sarkozy's successful bid for the French presidency in 2007. Mohamed Al Magariaf, who spent many years in exile because of his opposition to the regime, is the first leading figure in post-Gaddafi Libya to acknowledge that his country illegally financed the Sarkozy campaign. Al Magariaf, who spent much of his exile in the United States, also says that payments continued until 2009. His revelations were made in sections of his recent book that were removed by his publisher just before publication. Fabrice Arfi and Karl Laske reveal their explosive content.

Journalist 'witnessed deal' over Libyan funding of Sarkozy campaign

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A Tunisian journalist who became a prominent figure in Muammar Gaddafi's regime has revealed that he was present during the negotiations over Libyan funding of Nicolas Sarkozy's 2007 presidential campaign. Tahaer Dahec says that the sum agreed was 57 million euros, part of which went to a middle man. The revelation comes after a French TV station broadcast an interview with the late Libyan dictator in which Gaddafi himself spoke about how he funded the campaign. As Karl Laske reports, it is yet more powerful evidence of the illegal financing by a foreign power of the former French president's election bid.

Gaddafi funded ‘mentally deficient’ Sarkozy, interview claims

In audio recording Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi says he helped bankroll former French president's 2007 presidential bid.

Gaddafi-Sarkozy corruption affair: ex-spy chief 'ready to help French investigation'

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Abdallah Senoussi, le 21 août 2011 à Tripoli.  © Reuters Abdallah Senoussi, le 21 août 2011 à Tripoli. © Reuters

Colonel Gaddafi's former intelligence chief is said to be ready to cooperate fully with French judges who are probing claims that the Libyan regime illegally funded Nicolas Sarkozy's successful presidential election campaign in 2007. Abdullah Senussi's daughter told Mediapart: 'My father can help the judges find the proof.' Anoud Senussi has been in Paris to ask officials at the Elysée Palace to intercede on behalf of her father, who faces the death sentence in Libya where he is currently held on war crime charges. Fabrice Arfi reports.

 

Sarkozy’s legal woes roll on despite court ruling

Probe into ex-president's role in Bettencourt affair is over but other cases threaten damage to his reputation as he mulls over poltical comeback.