Keyword: Socialist Party

New leader for French Socialist Party emerges after rival quits race

Olivier Faure, 49, is to become the new leader of France's Socialist Party, which suffered a crushing defeat in last year's legislative elections, after comfortably winning the first of two rounds of voting and with the announcement on Friday that his only serious rival, former agriculture minister Stéphane Le Foll, will not stand for the final round on March 29th.

Tensions as cash-strapped Socialist Party plans to shed more than half its staff

By
For sale: the Socialist Party's headquarters at rue de Solférino in Paris. © Reuters For sale: the Socialist Party's headquarters at rue de Solférino in Paris. © Reuters

The Socialist Party performed miserably in the French presidential elections and poorly in the subsequent Parliamentary elections, and is  so short of money it is selling off its party headquarters at rue de Solférino in Paris. It has now also just announced a redundancy plan which will see the number of staff it employs in Paris cut from 97 to just 38 by the spring of 2018. Employees, meanwhile, are complaining about the likely redundancy terms. Christophe Gueugneau reports.

Ex-candidate Hamon quits France's Socialist Party to start new movement

Defeated presidential candidate Benoît Hamon announces plans to establish a new 'First of July movement' aimed at rebuilding ailing Left.

Former French prime minister Valls quits Socialist Party

A source close to Manuel Valls said that the former premier would now be allied to President Emmanuel Macron's centrist group.

The terminal collapse of the French Socialist Party

By
Staring at oblivion: Socialist Party leader Jean-Christophe Cambadélis. © Reuters Staring at oblivion: Socialist Party leader Jean-Christophe Cambadélis. © Reuters

The French Socialist Party emerged from last Sunday’s legislative election first round in tatters, dwarfed not only by the massive surge of president Emmanuel Macron’s new centrist party, but also the conservatives, the far-right and, importantly, the radical-left. The results followed its disastrous score in the presidential elections, and it is forecast to be put to the sword in the final round this coming weekend. The party’s debacle is more than a simple election defeat; it signals the end of the road for it as a party of government, argues Fabien Escalona, a specialist in European social democrat movements. In this analysis, he argues that the rare previous examples of parties of Western democracies that have similarly collapsed offer little hope it will ever recover.  

French socialists head closer to implosion as more jump ship for Macron

By
July 2015: (left to right) President François Hollande, defence minister Jean-Yves Le Drian, then-economy minister Emmanuel Macron and Prime Minister Manuel Valls at the Elysée Palace. © Reuters. July 2015: (left to right) President François Hollande, defence minister Jean-Yves Le Drian, then-economy minister Emmanuel Macron and Prime Minister Manuel Valls at the Elysée Palace. © Reuters.

The French Socialist Party is closer than ever to implosion following the announcement by one of its veteran stalwarts, defence minister Jean-Yves Le Drian, that he was backing maverick centrist presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron, a former economy minister and advisor to President François Hollande, instead of the party’s nominee Benoît Hamon. Lénaïg Bredoux reports.   

Key socialist minister backs centrist French presidential candidate

Maverick centrist Emmanuel Macron received a significant boost to his presidential election campaign when defence minister Jean-Yves Le Drian, a veteran Socialist Party figure, announced his support for Macron's candidature in an interview published Friday. 

Socialist presidential candidate Hamon kickstarts his campaign

Socialist presidential candidate Benoît Hamon, trailing centrist Emmanuel Macron and far-right leader Marine Le Pen in opinion surveys of voting intentions, held a major rally in Paris in which he described rightwing rivals as being candidates of 'the money party'. 

Ex-French PM Valls refuses to back his party's presidential candidate

Former prime minister Manuel Valls has refused to publicly back Benoît Hamon, the French Socialist Party's presidential candidate who beat him in party primary elections earlier this year with a markedly a leftwing programme in contrast to that of Valls.

Socialist candidate Hamon struggles to make voice heard in atypical French election

Benoît Hamon on the evening he won the socialist primary election in January 2017. © Reuters Benoît Hamon on the evening he won the socialist primary election in January 2017. © Reuters

The official Socialist Party candidate in the French presidential election, Benoît Hamon, has been deserted by a section of the right wing of his own party who are opting to support the independent centrist Emmanuel Macron. The latest high-profile figures to support Macron are former Paris mayor Bertrand Delanoë and defence minister Jean-Yves Le Drian, a close ally of President François Hollande. Some in Hamon's team say the defections make it easier for their candidate to make his pitch on the left. But as Stéphane Alliès and Lénaïg Bredoux report, his campaign is so far pretty much inaudible.

France's right-wing scandals leave socialists struggling to be heard

Presidential candidates Benoît Hamon and Jean-Luc Mélenchon complain that uproar is smothering discussion of the real campaign issues.

French presidential race: the insoluble divide of the Left

By
Benoît Hamon: seeking a path to party unity. Benoît Hamon: seeking a path to party unity.

With just ten weeks to go before voting begins in the first round of France’s presidential elections, newly-elected Socialist Party candidate Benoît Hamon has revealed a campaign team made up of fellow leftwingers but also of allies of President François Hollande and former prime minister Manuel Valls.  While Hamon’s olive branch to the party’s Right may dissipate its predicted desertion in favour of maverick centrist Emmanuel Macron, it suggests there can be little, if any, chance that he can reach an alliance with radical-left candidate Jean-Luc Mélenchon. Mediapart political analyst Hubert Huertas sketches here the fundamental divide between Mélenchon and Hamon and what is at stake for the future of the Socialist Party.

How primaries cleared out old guard from French politics

By

The list of victims of the recent presidential primary elections held by the Left and Right in France is remarkable. Two presidents, two prime ministers and a number of senior former ministers have been rejected after rebellious voters gave their verdicts. The primary process - which ended on Sunday with the unlikely election of Benoît Hamon as the official socialist candidate for the presidential contest – has proved something of an earthquake for the French political establishment, writes Hubert Huertas.

Divided French socialists choose leftist Hamon as presidential candidate

Benoît Hamon (right) with Socialist Party leader Jean-Christophe Cambadélis (centre) and Manuel Valls. © Christophe Gueugneau Benoît Hamon (right) with Socialist Party leader Jean-Christophe Cambadélis (centre) and Manuel Valls. © Christophe Gueugneau

Benoît Hamon, the leftist candidate bidding for the Socialist Party’s nomination to run in France’s presidential elections this spring, has won a resounding victory over his rival, the former prime minister Manuel Valls, in the final round of the primary contest on Sunday. Hamon, 49, who represents a clear break with the policies of the current socialist government and President François Hollande, will run on a manifesto that eats into that of the radical-left, with significant consequences for the spread of the vote in the presidential election, and also on the future cohesion of France’s beleaguered Socialist Party. Follow the results and reactions as they happened throughout the evening in this live report.

The Guardian view of French socialists: 'getting left behind'

British daily The Guardian reviews the state of the French Left ahead of this weekend's vote to choose the presidential election candidate for the Socialist Party and its allies.