Interviews

  • Brexit repeal bill turns back 'on a system of laws that influenced and became the fabric' of UK society

    By Hélaine Lefrançois

    The British parliament was on Thursday presented with the bill of law that aims to transfer European Union (EU) law into British law at the moment of the country’s exit from the EU in two years time. The European Union (Withdrawal) Bill, more widely known as the “repeal bill”, is necessary to avoid a black hole in legislation on the day after Britain leaves the union, but will allow the British parliament to subsequently remove any number of the EU laws adopted into national legislation. For an explanation of the complexity of the task, Mediapart’s UK correspondent Hélaine Lefrançois spoke to lawyer Robert Bell, specialised in EU and British competition laws with the London law firm Bryan Cave who says that, beyond the proposed legislation, “I just do not see how Brexit can be negotiated in two years”.

  • Tiananmen protester warns of global threat from China's 'money-based' system

    By
    Dissident Wang Dan. © Reuters Dissident Wang Dan. © Reuters

    Wang Dan was one of the student leaders in the Tiananmen Square protests in Beijing in 1989 and was later jailed twice before going into exile. He recently visited Paris to give a series of lectures on the continuing impact of the movement and spoke to Mediapart about his involvement in the protests and his reading of the situation today in China and its role in the world. Gilles Taine reports.

  • Exclusive: Macron speaks out on Trump, Putin, Palestine, Syria, and the Greek debt

     © Mediapart © Mediapart

    Emmanuel Macron, who was elected as France’s new president on Sunday, gave his last interview before his landslide victory to Mediapart, in which he detailed the measures and policies he would adopt over his five-year term of office. During the two-hour interview on Friday evening, he detailed his approach to a number of foreign policy issues - which were little mentioned during his campaign - including French military intervention abroad, his views on Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the Greek debt crisis, and US reluctance to implement the Paris COP 21 measures to combat climate change.

  • Fillon benefactor reveals 'pressure' for his silence and why his memoirs are on hold

    By
    Robert Bourgi. © Reuters Robert Bourgi. © Reuters

    Lawyer Robert Bourgi, 72, is a veteran figure of “la Françafrique”, the once-rife secret and corrupt network of relations between successive French and despotic African governments, which included the illegal funding of French politicians and parties in return for favours and protection. His name resurfaced last month in the scandal-hit presidential election campaign of conservative candidate François Fillon, when Bourgi revealed it was he who offered Fillon two expensive tailor-made suits, raising further questions over Fillon’s probity and political independence. In this interview from Beirut, where he is sitting out the rest of the election campaign, Bourgi gave Mediapart his version of his relationship with Fillon, who he says asked him to deny being a benefactor, and lifts the lid on the murky practices in French politics. His account offers an insight into decades of political corruption.

  • Veteran anti-corruption magistrates on France's problem with sleaze

    By and
    Eva Joly and Éric de Montgolfier. © Reuters Eva Joly and Éric de Montgolfier. © Reuters

    The scandals hanging over this spring’s French presidential elections highlight the endemic problems of corruption across the French political class which has been steeped in sleaze for decades. In this interview with Mediapart, two veteran and emblematic figures of the fight against corruption, former investigating magistrate Eva Joly and former public prosecutor Éric de Montgolfier, set out why they believe the problem has flourished for so long and what measures must be taken to effectively tackle it.

  • The inside story of life and death in a French industrial slaughterhouse

    By
    Geoffrey Le Guilcher © DR Geoffrey Le Guilcher © DR

    During the summer of 2016, journalist and Mediapart contributor Geoffrey Le Guilcher covertly gained employment as a worker on the production line of an industrial slaughterhouse in Brittany, north-west France. Le Guilcher infiltrated the lines to see for himself the infernal environment where, knife in hand, he was tasked with removing the fat from half-carcasses of cows at a rate of one every minute. He discovered not only the dreadful plight of the animals, but also the extreme duress placed on employees, whose relentless working rhythm drove some of those he befriended to drink and drugs. His experiences are detailed in a book, Steak Machine, published this month in France. Here he tells Rachida El Azzouzi about the horrors of the slaughterhouse.

  • Judith Butler on the 'fascist phenomenon' that put Trump into power

    By
    trump-discours-bis

    US President-elect Donald Trump will be sworn into office on Friday, as much of the world holds its breath for the start of what is arguably the most controversial presidency in American history. In this interview with Mediapart, US thinker and academic Judith Butler analyses the true political nature of the 70-year-old businessman and reality-show star who is to lead the world's most powerful nation, and who is already at the centre of international tensions. She argues that behind Trump’s electoral success is “a fascist phenomenon” and says that “many rejoice to see this awkward and not very intelligent person posturing as the centre of the world, and gaining power through that posturing”.


  • NGOs drop support for 'ill-prepared' Calais Jungle evacuation

    By
    A group of migrants close to the "Jungle" camp in Calais, October 1st 2016. © Reuters A group of migrants close to the "Jungle" camp in Calais, October 1st 2016. © Reuters

    The notorious makeshift migrant camp in the French Channel port of Calais, which NGOs estimate houses between 8,000 and 10,000 people, including 1,300 minors without parents, is to be evacuated and razed in the coming weeks. But 11 humanitarian associations involved in providing assistance for the migrants living in a shantytown of huts and tents known as “the Jungle”, many of which initially supported the move, have now applied for a court order to halt the operation, arguing that it is “a violation of the fundamental rights of the exiled”. Carine Fouteau hears from the head of one of the most active NGOs, L’Auberge des Migrants, why it has now come out against the evacuation and his fears over the consequences.

  • Pulitzer winner Walter Robinson on Catholic Church's paedophile cover-ups

    By Daphné Gastaldi
    A scene from the film Spotlight. A scene from the film Spotlight.

    Walter Robinson is an investigative journalist with The Boston Globe who in 2002 exposed a vast paedophile scandal in the American Catholic Church, for which he won the Pulitzer Prize in 2003 and inspired the 2015 movie Spotlight. As the French Catholic Church becomes ever more engulfed by revelations of paedophile abuse and a system of protection for the priests involved, Robinson, in this interview with Daphné Gastaldi, details what he uncovered in the US within a system that precisely mirrors the scandal in France.

  • Anthropologist Scott Atran on why Islamic State is a wider threat than realised

    By

    Anthropologist Scott Atran, a research fellow with Oxford University who also teaches at University of Michigan and John Jay College in New York, is a leading expert in the study of the motivations of those who join jihadist ranks and the rise of the Islamic State group, and advises governments and international organizations on the issue. In this interview with Joseph Confavreux, he argues that the draw of IS is widely misunderstood, is not limited to disenfranchised communities, and that the organization can only be overcome by a different military, political and psychological approach by Western nations.