Opinions

  • The lessons from the past as France celebrates its football champions

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    A man celebrates France's victory in the World Cup on Sunday in the Goutte d'Or neighbourhood of Paris. © Rachida El Azzouzi A man celebrates France's victory in the World Cup on Sunday in the Goutte d'Or neighbourhood of Paris. © Rachida El Azzouzi

    After winning the football World Cup tournament in Russia, France’s national football team arrived home on Monday, when rejoicing crowds turned out to applaud them riding a double-decker bus along the Champs-Elysées avenue in central Paris, before a reception at the presidential palace. Since France’s victory over Croatia in the final on Sunday, streets across the country have been swamped in a flag-waving, car-horn blazing party of multi-coloured jubilation. But, warns Mediapart political commentator Hubert Huertas, while this temporary moment of collective joy is one to embrace, it heralds no change for the country’s underlining social, political and economic problems.

  • The Aquarius odyssey: do migrants have a 'vocation' to die?

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    Some of the migrants rescued by the Aquarius were transferred to Italian coastguard ships in a convoy heading for Spain. © Karpov / SOS Méditerranée Some of the migrants rescued by the Aquarius were transferred to Italian coastguard ships in a convoy heading for Spain. © Karpov / SOS Méditerranée

    The odyssey of the migrant rescue ship Aquarius offers a new example of the violence of Europe-wide immigration policies, and not only those of the far-right in power in Italy, writes  Mediapart co-editor Carine Fouteau. For the migrants onboard the Aquarius, who will eventually arrive in a state of exhaustion in Spain, the ship’s long and deviated route for a safe haven is yet further confirmation that they and others like them are simply considered as a burden by European countries – if, that is, they manage to arrive alive on the continent’s shores.  

  • Why Cannes has lost the plot

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    The red carpet at the Palais des festivals in Cannes. The red carpet at the Palais des festivals in Cannes.

    The 71st Cannes Film Festival officially opened on Tuesday evening, and over the next two weeks the Riviera town will be bustling with cinema stars, directors, producers and hopeful actors, hundreds of journalists, TV crews and crowds of sightseers. But not Mediapart, whose cinema critic Emmanuel Burdeau sets out here why he sees no sense in covering an event that has lost touch with the evolutions of the so-called "seventh art”.  

  • The homage France owes to Spanish Republican refugees

    By Nicolas Lebourg
    Spanish refugees arriving across the French border in the village of Le Perthus, February 1939. © David Seymour. Musée national de l'histoire et des cultures de l'immigration Spanish refugees arriving across the French border in the village of Le Perthus, February 1939. © David Seymour. Musée national de l'histoire et des cultures de l'immigration

    A move to include the 150th anniversary of the birth of the notorious French anti-Semitic and far-right author Charles Maurras in official ceremonies across France this year caused such an outcry that it was struck off the agenda, calling into question the criteria employed by the country’s learned national commemorations committee. Amid the farce over Maurras, historian and Mediapart contributor Nicolas Lebourg argues here that a truly worthy commemoration sorely missing from the official calendar is that of the plight, and unsung contribution to France, of the hundreds of thousands of Spanish Civil War refugees who, in the runup to World War II, crossed into the country seeking refuge from the Franco regime.

  • Emmanuel Macron, the Spin King

    French President Emmanuel Macron. © Reuters French President Emmanuel Macron. © Reuters

    French President Emmanuel Macron has enjoyed a headline-grabbing week of appearances, from hosting international CEOs in the sumptuous surrounds of the Palace of Versailles, to being feted by the world elite at the Davos Economic Forum in Switzerland, before touching down in rural France to woo the country’s agricultural sector. The packed agenda was the latest example of the young president’s skill in occupying the media agenda and promoting double-pronged policies that have anesthetised public opinion, argues Mediapart editor François Bonnet, along with political and economic correspondents Romaric Godin, Manuel Jardinaud and Ellen Salvi, in this joint analysis of Macron's impressive mastership of the art of spin.

  • The case of the French justice minister, an MP friend and a muzzled prosecution service

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    Jean-Jacques Urvoas inside France's National Assembly when he was justice minister. © Reuters Jean-Jacques Urvoas inside France's National Assembly when he was justice minister. © Reuters

    Earlier this month it was revealed that a French justice minister, Jean-Jacques Urvoas, passed on to a Member of Parliament confidential information about a police investigation targeting the MP for suspected tax fraud, money laundering and influence peddling. Mediapart investigative journalist Fabrice Arfi sets out here why the case is just the latest demonstration of the intolerable lack of independence of France’s prosecution services.

  • What exactly is Mediapart the name of?

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    That is the question we ask ourselves after these dizzy recent weeks of a political and media cabal against us, writes Mediapart publishing editor Edwy Plenel in this op-ed article, in which he offers an answer and responds to the extraordinary call by former French prime minister Manuel Valls that Mediapart be “removed from public debate.”   

  • The Tariq Ramadan sexual abuse affair: crusade of the imbeciles

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    Leading the charge: former premier Manuel Valls. © Reuters Leading the charge: former premier Manuel Valls. © Reuters

    In recent days Mediapart has been burnt at the metaphorical stake for having supposed “complicity” with the Muslim intellectual and Oxford University professor Tariq Ramadan. Worst still, it has been hinted that this site may have deliberately ignored the actions of a man who today stands accused of rape and sexual assault, claims he denies. This ignominious Donald Trump-style campaign, led by former prime minister Manuel Valls, is part of a wider political movement which brings together elements of the Left who were destroyed at recent elections and the nationalist Right. Mediapart's editor François Bonnet responds to the claims.

  • Why nuclear weapons must be abolished

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    North Korean leader Kim Jong-un watches a missile launch in a photo issued on September 16, 2017, by that country's official news agency. © KCNA North Korean leader Kim Jong-un watches a missile launch in a photo issued on September 16, 2017, by that country's official news agency. © KCNA

    The award of the Nobel Peace Prize to the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), a coalition of hundreds of NGOs from dozens of countries, puts in stark relief the irresponsibility of those states – including France – who base their security on dissuasion by terror. Mediapart’s publishing editor and co-founder Edwy Plenel argues that far from keeping the peace, nuclear weapons spread the risk of a terrible catastrophe, as the current Korean crisis shows.

  • The blush-saving rhetoric surrounding France's labour law reforms

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    The French government has presented the detail of its labour law reform, which were a pillar of President Emmanuel Macron’s election manifesto and which he said was urgent "because it will create jobs". But already, Prime Minister Édouard Philippe has downplayed the importance of the reforms, which he now describes as “just the start”. Mediapart economics correspondent Romaric Godin argues in this op-ed article that this is a typical example of the rhetoric surrounding liberal reforms, such as during the European debt crisis, in which their limited results become obscured by the supposed necessity for yet more urgent deregulation.