Reports

  • Taken for a ride: the angry mood of Deliveroo food couriers in France

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    A Deliveroo courier at the protest in Place de la République in central Paris on August 7th 2019. © Reuters/Charles Platiau A Deliveroo courier at the protest in Place de la République in central Paris on August 7th 2019. © Reuters/Charles Platiau

    Couriers working for the meal delivery service are angry at the new rates of pay that they now receive, which they say will leave many of them worse off than before. They are particularly upset that the minimum payment of 4.5 euros a delivery has been axed. Rouguyata Sall joined Deliveroo riders as they took their protest to local restaurants in central Paris.

  • A switch to mains for French Guiana’s Amerindians

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    French Guiana, which is both a département and a region of France, has a surface area equivalent to that of Ireland but a population of just 270,000, almost half of which is centred around its capital Cayenne. In the west of the region, close to the border with Surinam, is a vast forested land called Haut-Maroni which is home to the Amerindian Wayana, Teko et Apalai peoples, whose isolated villages were finally connected to a mobile phone network just four years ago. Now, after years of delays to a 12 million-euro project launched in 2009, they are finally being connected to an electricity network of local photovoltaic power plants, a development which promises to transform their daily lives. Marion Briswalter reports from Haut-Maroni.

  • 'Anger has turned to hate': French government and police mired in scandal of music reveller's death

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    A mural depicting Steve Maia Caniço and the incidents of the night of June 21st, painted on the riverside quai in Nantes where he disppeared. © Elisa Perrigueur A mural depicting Steve Maia Caniço and the incidents of the night of June 21st, painted on the riverside quai in Nantes where he disppeared. © Elisa Perrigueur

    The body of Steve Maia Caniço, 24, was finally found earlier this week in the River Loire in the town of Nantes, north-west France, close to where he apparently fell from a quayside amid a violent police charge on an overnight rave party on June 21st. The party was one of thousands held during the national Fête de la Musique street events, but turned sour after a confrontation with police who used stun and teargas grenades, Tasers and LBD rubber pellet guns to disperse the crowd. His confirmed death has further fuelled growing controversy over violent police tactics, which the government has defended, while an internal police report that found no link between Caniço’s fatal fall and the police assault has caused outrage among those present that night. “The authorities have transformed anger into hate,” said one of his friends, ahead of a demonstration planned for this weekend. Elisa Perrigueur reports from Nantes.

  • The hidden scandal of Tunisia's female farm workers killed on the roads

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    Rebah standing in front of her sister's makeshift hairdressing salon. © LB Rebah standing in front of her sister's makeshift hairdressing salon. © LB

    A number of fatal road accidents in April 2019 highlighted the plight of many female agricultural workers in the North African country. These women, who have long been regarded as a source of cheap exploitable labour and many of whom live in poverty, are effectively forced to take perilous journeys in the backs of pick-ups and lorries to their place of work. They are now hoping for changes in their work and living conditions. Lilia Blaise reports.

  • Life in the time of Brexit: an English village divided

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    The village of Widdington in Essex, eastern England, April 2019. © AP The village of Widdington in Essex, eastern England, April 2019. © AP

    In the well-heeled village of Widdington in rural Essex in eastern England, the residents are in a state of inner turmoil. Like the rest of the country this small community is pondering the issue of Brexit – which now faces a new deadline of the end of October 2019 – with passionate, engaging and ultimately irreconcilable arguments. Antoine Perraud reports.

  • 'Yellow Vests' stage national meeting as movement faces 'turning point'

    By Pierre-Yves Bulteau
    The outside of the community centre at Saint-Nazaire. © PYB The outside of the community centre at Saint-Nazaire. © PYB

    At the end of January 75 delegates from 'Yellow Vest' groups around France met at an 'assembly of assemblies' at Commercy in the north east of the country. From April 5th to 7th some 300 delegates will converge on a community centre in Saint-Nazaire in the west for a second such national assembly. The three-day gathering based on “exemplary fraternity” has required lots of last-minute local preparations and comes at what some describe as a key point in the protest movement's short life. Pierre-Yves Bulteau reports.

  • In Mexico 'you can die just for being a woman'

    By Marie Hibon
    In April 2013 a man displays the photos of women who have died or disappeared in Ecatepec, Mexico. © Henry Romero (Reuters) In April 2013 a man displays the photos of women who have died or disappeared in Ecatepec, Mexico. © Henry Romero (Reuters)

    Figures show that in the month of January more than ten women a day were murdered in Mexico. In some areas of the country, say women's rights campaigners, women are disposed of like “a piece of garbage”. Meanwhile to the dismay of local associations the new left-wing government in the country is not treating the issue as a priority. Marie Hibon reports on the appalling situation facing many women in Mexico.

  • The 'yellow vests' who are experimenting with direct democracy

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    The first appeal made by the 'yellow vests at Commercy in north-east France. © DR The first appeal made by the 'yellow vests at Commercy in north-east France. © DR

    Two months ago in the small town of Commercy in north-east France a group of 'yellow vest' protestors created a citizens popular assembly. It is gaining supporters: on January 26th around 30 delegations from across France will gather in the town. François Bonnet reports on a local experiment in what some yellow vests define as “libertarian municipalism”, a concept pioneered by American social theorist Murray Bookchin.

  • From Guinea to Bayonne: the long journey of two youths seeking France's protection

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    Authorities in the French city of Bayonne are struggling to cope with the number of migrants coming from across the nearby Spanish border. Mediapart met Joseph and Moriba, 'blood  brothers' who are seeking France's protection after nearly dying at sea crossing to Europe from Morocco. After a legal battle, Joseph has now been recognised as a minor by the French courts while Moriba's request will be heard on appeal shortly. Mathilde Mathieu reports.

  • The Paris suburbs where Jews no longer feel safe

    By Sarah Smaïl (Bondy Blog Pour Mediapart)
    Rabbi Haim Lumbroso with Pierrefitte mayor Michel Fourcade during Hanukah celebrations. © Sarah Smaïl/Bondy Blog Rabbi Haim Lumbroso with Pierrefitte mayor Michel Fourcade during Hanukah celebrations. © Sarah Smaïl/Bondy Blog

    In November, French Prime Minister Édouard Philippe announced that over the first nine months of this year there had been a 69% increase in reported anti-Semitic attacks in the country compared with the same period in 2017. Some urban areas are witnessing a desertification of once significant Jewish communities, and notably in the socially deprived Paris suburbs of Seine-Saint-Denis, with a relatively large Muslim population, where synagogues are closing down as increasing numbers of Jews are moving out amid religious tensions and fears of insecurity. Others, meanwhile, and notably religious and community leaders, are locally active in attempting to fight anti-Semitism through dialogue and education. Sarah Smaïl, from Mediapart’s online partner Bondy Blog, reports from Seine-Saint-Denis.