Reports

  • Tragedy of the Central African Republic: diamonds in the soil, poverty on the streets

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    Les murs des maisons de Carnot rappellent que le diamant est une richesse importante de la ville. © Thomas Cantaloube Les murs des maisons de Carnot rappellent que le diamant est une richesse importante de la ville. © Thomas Cantaloube

    The Central African Republic is regularly held up as a country rich in diamonds, uranium and other valuable minerals. But despite the wealth of its natural resources this former French colony remains one of the poorest countries on earth. As French troops try to restore order in this strife-torn country, Mediapart's Thomas Cantaloube reports from the mining area of Carnot and discovers the reasons why prosperity continues to be so elusive.

  • Tensions mount between Paris and Bern as Swiss bankers due before Cahuzac probe

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    Amid a fast-developing dispute between the French and Swiss justice services, two Paris magistrates leading a judicial investigation into how former budget minister Jérôme Cahuzac established secret foreign bank accounts are this week due to question two Swiss bankers about their roles in helping him hide funds from the French tax authorities over two decades. François Reyl, CEO of Geneva bank Reyl & Cie and his father Dominique Reyl, founder of the company, have been summoned to appear before the magistrates on Tuesday and Wednesday, when they face being placed under investigation for ‘laundering the proceeds of tax evasion’. Agathe Duparc reports on the background to what may prove to be a legal watershed for the Swiss banking industry, whose 'professional confidentiality' the justice authorities in Bern have shown themselves keen to protect.

    (See update at end of article page)

  • How French hospitals flout medical confidentiality with private contractors

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    French hospitals increasingly allow private healthcare administration companies access to patients’ confidential medical records in violation of the ethics and regulations governing the medical profession. The widespread practice, which has come to light after a hospital doctor in western France turned whistleblower, is a side-effect of an increasingly complex system cash-strapped healthcare establishments must use to obtain state refunding of the medical acts they perform. Caroline Coq-Chodorge reports.

  • The battle in Burgundy to save a forested land from a job-promising plant

    By Anne Duvivier
    Coupe à blanc d'une parcelle © Philippe Maillard Coupe à blanc d'une parcelle © Philippe Maillard

    In a struggling rural region of Burgundy, at the gates of the Morvan national park, locals have mounted a campaign to halt a private company from creating a vast wood-processing industrial site which would bring hundreds of jobs to the area. Local politicians support the project as offering a much-needed boost to the flagging local economy, while its opponents argue the environmental cost for a short-term gain is unacceptable. The future of the site now hangs on a ruling due from France’s highest court, the Council of State. “What’s being played out here is truly a debate about society,” says Christian Paul, socialist Member of Parliament for the region and one of the project’s supporters. Anne Duvivier reports.

  • Poverty forcing French pensioners to go back to work

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    The number of retired people in France taking up jobs after they have supposedly ended their working lives has doubled in recent years. At least half of them go back to work because they cannot live on their meagre pensions. Rachida El Azzouzi travelled to one French city to meet the pensioners who fear that they may go 'straight from the toolbox to a wooden box in the cemetery'.

  • 'We'll die on the job': the dread and despair over new French pensions system reform

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     © Rachida El Azzouzi © Rachida El Azzouzi

    French trades unions will meet with business organisations this Thursday for the start of three months of talks and negotiations on reforming the French pensions system,  ahead of a bill of reform which President François Hollande wants to present before parliament by the end of the year. At stake is the reduction of the spiralling deficit of the pay-as-you-go pensions system, which currently costs the equivalent 13.3% of the country’s GDP. “Since we are living longer, sometimes much longer, we’ll have to work at least a bit longer,” said Hollande in May, confirming that the minimum retirement age, set at 62 with rights to full benefits obtainable only after 41.5 years of contributions in unpopular reforms in 2010, is to be further increased. The issue is highly charged politically, with Hollande under strong EU pressure to reduce the public deficit while also facing widespread opposition to any further extension of the retirement age from his grass-roots supporters on the Left. Unions warn that for vast numbers of manual workers, worn out after decades of physically gruelling jobs, a further hike of the retirement age will leave them with few other prospects to look forward to other than ill-health and death. Rachida El Azzouzi travelled to the Charente region in south-west France to meet with employees of a battery-making plant who have spent most of their working lives exposed to toxic materials and working alternating shifts of repetitive, straining tasks. They speak of their dread of another rise of the retirement age and why, if Hollande attempts to do so, he can count on a fierce fight.

  • The sad stories from the Paris refuge offering a lifeline to rejected young gays

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    Gerdel dans les locaux parisiens de l'association. © M.T. Gerdel dans les locaux parisiens de l'association. © M.T.

    Over the past eight months France has been locked in a fiercely divisive and often violent debate over the government’s same-sex marriage bill, which was finally enshrined into law last Saturday by President François Hollande. Gay rights groups have denounced mounting homophobia amid the hot contestation to the law, while opponents are due to stage a further mass protest in Paris on May 26th. Le Refuge is a national association that offers shelter, medical services and psychological counselling to youngsters who have been rejected and often made homeless by their families because of their homosexuality. It has seen a surge in requests for help since the debate kicked off in earnest last autumn, increasing five-fold over the same period one year earlier. Marine Turchi visited the association’s Paris centre and heard the distressing stories of those for whom it offers a lifeline.

  • Foreign investors scent profits as Greece sells off the family silver

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    L'entrée du Golden Hall © dr L'entrée du Golden Hall © dr

    Has Greece become the new El Dorado for foreign investors? The country is currently busily selling off state-run enterprises, lucrative concessions in state monopolies and coastal resort sites, and has slashed labour costs. The result is that numerous overseas businesses and funds, including some from China, Russia and Qatar, are eager to pour cash into the crisis-stricken country despite local opposition to many of the sell-offs. Amélie Poinssot reports.

  • The pride and prejudice as France adopts same-sex marriage law

    France is set to become the 14th country worldwide - and the ninth in Europe - to open up marriage to homosexual couples after its parliament on Tuesday voted in favour of a bill of law to give marriage and adoption rights to couples of the same sex. It now remains for the socialist government to enact the law, while a group of conservative opposition MPs, whose UMP party has campaigned against the bill, have promised to contest it before France’s Constitutional Council. The vote on an issue that has divided public opinion comes after six months of demonstrations for and against amid sometimes hysterical rhetoric from politicians. Mediapart reporters joined separate rallies in Paris held by opponents and supporters of the marriage reform. The opinions expressed reveal apparently irreconcilable views over the issue, while many gays spoke of their indignation and fear over the upsurge in insults and violence they have personally witnessed since last autumn.

  • The colonial ghost haunting the rebuilding of a post-war Mali

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     © Thomas Cantaloube © Thomas Cantaloube

    The French military intervention against Islamist forces in Mali has been widely welcomed by the country’s population, and has produced a radical change in what were often strained relations between the two countries. While the Islamist rebels have been pushed back to the far north of Mali, Operation Serval is now due to begin winding down next month, leaving a series of new and major challenges ahead. Many in the country are hoping France, the former colonial ruler, will play an important part in meeting them. For beyond securing the country from further Jihadist attacks, Mali needs to be rebuilt, from its vital infrastructures to its political institutions, discredited by an aging and corrupt elite. Could the country now find itself under the trusteeship of France?  Thomas Cantaloube reports from the Malian capital Bamako, where the ghost of colonialism haunts the path to a brighter future.