Reports

  • The hidden scandal of Tunisia's female farm workers killed on the roads

    By
    Rebah standing in front of her sister's makeshift hairdressing salon. © LB Rebah standing in front of her sister's makeshift hairdressing salon. © LB

    A number of fatal road accidents in April 2019 highlighted the plight of many female agricultural workers in the North African country. These women, who have long been regarded as a source of cheap exploitable labour and many of whom live in poverty, are effectively forced to take perilous journeys in the backs of pick-ups and lorries to their place of work. They are now hoping for changes in their work and living conditions. Lilia Blaise reports.

  • Life in the time of Brexit: an English village divided

    By
    The village of Widdington in Essex, eastern England, April 2019. © AP The village of Widdington in Essex, eastern England, April 2019. © AP

    In the well-heeled village of Widdington in rural Essex in eastern England, the residents are in a state of inner turmoil. Like the rest of the country this small community is pondering the issue of Brexit – which now faces a new deadline of the end of October 2019 – with passionate, engaging and ultimately irreconcilable arguments. Antoine Perraud reports.

  • 'Yellow Vests' stage national meeting as movement faces 'turning point'

    By Pierre-Yves Bulteau
    The outside of the community centre at Saint-Nazaire. © PYB The outside of the community centre at Saint-Nazaire. © PYB

    At the end of January 75 delegates from 'Yellow Vest' groups around France met at an 'assembly of assemblies' at Commercy in the north east of the country. From April 5th to 7th some 300 delegates will converge on a community centre in Saint-Nazaire in the west for a second such national assembly. The three-day gathering based on “exemplary fraternity” has required lots of last-minute local preparations and comes at what some describe as a key point in the protest movement's short life. Pierre-Yves Bulteau reports.

  • In Mexico 'you can die just for being a woman'

    By Marie Hibon
    In April 2013 a man displays the photos of women who have died or disappeared in Ecatepec, Mexico. © Henry Romero (Reuters) In April 2013 a man displays the photos of women who have died or disappeared in Ecatepec, Mexico. © Henry Romero (Reuters)

    Figures show that in the month of January more than ten women a day were murdered in Mexico. In some areas of the country, say women's rights campaigners, women are disposed of like “a piece of garbage”. Meanwhile to the dismay of local associations the new left-wing government in the country is not treating the issue as a priority. Marie Hibon reports on the appalling situation facing many women in Mexico.

  • The 'yellow vests' who are experimenting with direct democracy

    By
    The first appeal made by the 'yellow vests at Commercy in north-east France. © DR The first appeal made by the 'yellow vests at Commercy in north-east France. © DR

    Two months ago in the small town of Commercy in north-east France a group of 'yellow vest' protestors created a citizens popular assembly. It is gaining supporters: on January 26th around 30 delegations from across France will gather in the town. François Bonnet reports on a local experiment in what some yellow vests define as “libertarian municipalism”, a concept pioneered by American social theorist Murray Bookchin.

  • From Guinea to Bayonne: the long journey of two youths seeking France's protection

    By

    Authorities in the French city of Bayonne are struggling to cope with the number of migrants coming from across the nearby Spanish border. Mediapart met Joseph and Moriba, 'blood  brothers' who are seeking France's protection after nearly dying at sea crossing to Europe from Morocco. After a legal battle, Joseph has now been recognised as a minor by the French courts while Moriba's request will be heard on appeal shortly. Mathilde Mathieu reports.

  • The Paris suburbs where Jews no longer feel safe

    By Sarah Smaïl (Bondy Blog Pour Mediapart)
    Rabbi Haim Lumbroso with Pierrefitte mayor Michel Fourcade during Hanukah celebrations. © Sarah Smaïl/Bondy Blog Rabbi Haim Lumbroso with Pierrefitte mayor Michel Fourcade during Hanukah celebrations. © Sarah Smaïl/Bondy Blog

    In November, French Prime Minister Édouard Philippe announced that over the first nine months of this year there had been a 69% increase in reported anti-Semitic attacks in the country compared with the same period in 2017. Some urban areas are witnessing a desertification of once significant Jewish communities, and notably in the socially deprived Paris suburbs of Seine-Saint-Denis, with a relatively large Muslim population, where synagogues are closing down as increasing numbers of Jews are moving out amid religious tensions and fears of insecurity. Others, meanwhile, and notably religious and community leaders, are locally active in attempting to fight anti-Semitism through dialogue and education. Sarah Smaïl, from Mediapart’s online partner Bondy Blog, reports from Seine-Saint-Denis.

  • Calais fears being sunk by looming ‘hard Brexit’

    By Elisa Perrigueur
    The port of Calais: dark times ahead? © Elisa Perrigueur The port of Calais: dark times ahead? © Elisa Perrigueur

    British Prime Minister Theresa May was in Brussels on Thursday and Friday for a frantic series of meetings to convince EU leaders to provide clarifications over her Brexit deal with Brussels, hoping for their help to obtain parliamentary approval of the agreement reached last month for the UK’s withdrawal from the bloc. But for most observers, the chances of avoiding a hard Brexit before the deadline of next March are receding by the day. In the northern French coastal town of Calais, through which tens of millions of tonnes of goods pass yearly in trade between the UK and the continent, many fear catastrophic consequences of a hard Brexit, with the very likely prospect of the Channel port becoming paralysed. Elisa Perrigueur reports.

  • The MP out on the frontline as disenchantment over Macron's presidency grows

    By
    MP Aina Kuric at a meeting in Reims, November 16th, 2018. © MJ MP Aina Kuric at a meeting in Reims, November 16th, 2018. © MJ

    Aina Kuric is a Member of Parliament for France's ruling La République en Marche party east of Paris and last week she held meetings with members of local volunteer groups, small-town mayors and councillors just as the “gilets jaunes” or yellow hi-vis jacket protests over fuel prices swept across France. In doing so she experienced at first hand the deep divide that is growing between the government and a section of the population increasingly gripped by despair. Mediapart's Manuel Jardinaud joined the MP on the trip to meet her constituents.

  • What it's like being a socialist in the United States

    By
    One of the rising stars in American socialism, 28-year-old Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. © Reuters One of the rising stars in American socialism, 28-year-old Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. © Reuters

    The very word has been anathema in America for so long. Yet in the wake of Bernie Sanders' strong showing in the Democratic Party primaries ahead of the last presidential election, more and more Americans are calling themselves “socialists”. Some are even winning elections. Mediapart's New York correspondent Mathieu Magnaudeix gives a pen portrait of some of these new candidates on the American Left who are fighting against capitalism as much as they are combating discrimination.