Karl Laske

J'ai rejoint Mediapart en mai 2011, après avoir été été journaliste à Libération de 1994 à 2011.

J'ai publié: Avec les compliments du Guide (avec Fabrice Arfi, Fayard, 2017), Les cartels du lait (avec Elsa Casalegno, Editions Don Quichotte, 2016), La Mémoire du plomb (Stock, 2012), Le Vrai Canard (avec Laurent Valdiguié, Stock, 2008, réédité en Points Seuil, 2010), Putsch au PS (collectif Victor Noir, Denoël, 2007), Machinations (avec Laurent Valdiguié, Denoël, 2006, réédité chez Pocket), Nicolas Sarkozy ou le destin de Brutus (collectif Victor Noir, Denoël, 2005), Des coffres si bien garnis, enquête sur les serviteurs de l'État-voyou (Denoël, 2004), Ils se croyaient intouchables (Albin Michel, 2000), Le banquier noir (Seuil, 1996).

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Ses Derniers articles

  • Former French minister and LVMH exec among six found guilty of political funding scam

    By and
    Three of the defendants (l-r): Nicolas Bazire, Thierry Gaubert and Ziad Takieddine. © Reuters Three of the defendants (l-r): Nicolas Bazire, Thierry Gaubert and Ziad Takieddine. © Reuters

    A Paris court has handed prison sentences to six men found guilty of organising a vast political funding scam involving kickbacks on French weapons sales to Saudi Arabia and Pakistan. The kickbacks, secretly transferred in cash sums, were to finance former French prime minister Édouard Balladur’s 1995 presidential election campaign. The men, who were on Monday given jail terms of between three and five years, include former minister Renaud Donnedieu de Vabres and Nicolas Bazire, a senior executive at luxury goods group LVMH. The verdicts end the financial chapter of what has become known as the “Karachi Affair”, an ongoing judicial saga that centres on the murders of 11 French naval engineers in Pakistan in 2002. Karl Laske and Fabrice Arfi report on the conclusions of the sentencing magistrates.

     

  • The strange saga of how France helped build Wuhan's top-security virus lab

    By and Jacques Massey
    French prime minister Bernard Cazeneuve during the inauguration of the laboratory at Wuhan, February 23rd 2017. © AFP/Johannes Eisele French prime minister Bernard Cazeneuve during the inauguration of the laboratory at Wuhan, February 23rd 2017. © AFP/Johannes Eisele

    The maximum-level biosafety laboratory at the Wuhan Institute of Virology was the first of its kind to be built in China, and has been the centre of huge speculation since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic which originated in that city. The laboratory, which is equipped to handle Class 4 pathogens (P4) including dangerous viruses such as Ebola, was built with the help of French experts and under the guidance of French billionaire businessman Alain Mérieux, despite strong objections by health and defence officials in Paris. Since the laboratory's inauguration by prime minister Bernard Cazeneuve in 2017, however, France has had no supervisory role in the running of the facility and planned cooperation between French researchers and the laboratory has come to a grinding halt. Karl Laske and Jacques Massey report.

  • Scientific expert threatens Louvre with legal action over Leonardo da Vinci exhibition

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    Expert Pascal Cotte during the digitisation project on the 'Mona Lisa' in 2004. © DR Expert Pascal Cotte during the digitisation project on the 'Mona Lisa' in 2004. © DR

    Pascal Cotte, a French scientist who has written several studies and two books on the 'Mona Lisa', and who has digitised several works by Leonardo da Vinci, has accused the Louvre Museum of “parasitism” in relation to his work. Cotte claims that in its major exhibition on the artist, which ends on February 24th, the Paris museum has not credited his discoveries and ground-breaking work on the artist and his most famous painting. Karl Laske reports.

  • New twist in Sarkozy-Libyan funding case after arrest of key former aide

    By and
    Thierry Gaubert at the court in Nanterre, west of Paris, in  2012 in an unrelated case. © Reuters Thierry Gaubert at the court in Nanterre, west of Paris, in 2012 in an unrelated case. © Reuters

    In January 2020 Thierry Gaubert, a former close aide to Nicolas Sarkozy, was arrested and then placed under formal investigation for “criminal conspiracy” in relation to claims that the former president's 2007 election campaign was funded with Libyan money. Gaubert is now free on bail, but banned from meeting with either Sarkozy or the ex-head of state's long-standing friend and ally Brice Hortefeux. As Fabrice Arfi and Karl Laske report, this move marks a major turning point in the long-running judge-led investigation.

  • Fugitive suspect in Sarkozy-Gaddafi funding probe jailed in France

    By and
    Alexandre Djouhri, pictured in London on February 26th 2019. © Niklas Halle'n/AFP Alexandre Djouhri, pictured in London on February 26th 2019. © Niklas Halle'n/AFP

    One of the key suspects in the marathon judicial probe into alleged funding of former French president Nicolas Sarkozy’s 2007 election campaign by the regime of late Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi was this weekend placed in preventive detention in France after losing a two-year legal battle to avoid his extradition from Britain. French judges have formally placed Alexandre Djouhri under investigation for nine alleged offences, including “active corruption”, aiding and abetting, and receiving, the proceeds of the “misappropriation of public funds”, “money laundering the proceeds of corruption”, “forgery and the use of forgeries” and “tax fraud”. Fabrice Arfi and Karl Laske report.

  • As protests sweep France, another 'oversight' by fallen pension reform tsar

    Jean-Paul Delevoye, who was forced to resign his post as France's High Commissioner for Pensions on Monday. © Reuters Jean-Paul Delevoye, who was forced to resign his post as France's High Commissioner for Pensions on Monday. © Reuters

    Hundreds of thousands of demonstrators took part in nationwide union-led protests in France on Tuesday against the government’s proposed reform of the pension system, while strike action disrupted many sectors including transport, education institutions, postal services and power supplies. Meanwhile, the government suffered a severe blow in its showdown with the unions after the forced resignation on Monday of the man regarded as the architect of the reforms, the High Commissioner for Pensions Jean-Paul Delevoye, for having failed to register as required by law ten of his present or recent outside professional activities. Now Mediapart can reveal yet another: his membership until 2017 of the London-based Brazzaville Foundation, which is in effect a propaganda arm for the strongman president of the Republic of the Congo.

  • Revealed: Sarkozy aide received Libyan funds in secret offshore account

    By and
    Left to right: newly elected Nicolas Sarkozy hosts Muammar Gaddafi in Paris; French-Lebanese intermediary Ziad Takieddine; Niolas Sarkozy's close allies Brice Hortefeux and Thierry Gaubert. © Reuters/Document Mediapart Left to right: newly elected Nicolas Sarkozy hosts Muammar Gaddafi in Paris; French-Lebanese intermediary Ziad Takieddine; Niolas Sarkozy's close allies Brice Hortefeux and Thierry Gaubert. © Reuters/Document Mediapart

    An investigation by Mediapart has confirmed that a longstanding close aide to former French president Nicolas Sarkozy received 440,000 euros in a secret offshore account paid from Libyan funds one year before the 2007 French presidential elections, casting further suspicion that Sarkozy’s successful bid was partly financed by the late Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi. The money was transferred by a shell company belonging to a French-Lebanese intermediary who is central to the funding allegations, through which transited several millions of euros from the Tripoli regime. Fabrice Arfi and Karl Laske report.

  • The 8-million-euro loan via a UAE bank that saved Marine Le Pen's far-right party

    By and
    Far-right leader Marine Le Pen in Paris on January 13th 2019. © Reuters Far-right leader Marine Le Pen in Paris on January 13th 2019. © Reuters

    The far-right Rassemblement National – the former Front National – was in serious financial difficulty after the Parliamentary and presidential elections in 2017 and was bailed out by a loan of 8 million euros. That loan, Mediapart can reveal, came from French businessman Laurent Foucher who has a range of commercial interests in Africa and who is close to Nicolas Sarkozy's former right-hand man Claude Guéant. The loan was transferred from a bank in the United Arab Emirates but questions still remain over the precise origin of the money. Karl Laske and Marine Turchi report.

  • Prosecutor recommends former French PM and minister stand trial for alleged corruption scam

    By and
    Édouard Balladur (centre) in 1995 with François Léotard (right) and Nicolas Sarkozy. © Reuters Édouard Balladur (centre) in 1995 with François Léotard (right) and Nicolas Sarkozy. © Reuters

    Senior public prosecutor François Molins has concluded that former French prime minister Édouard Balladur and the defence minister who served under him, François Léotard, should be sent for trial for siphoning payments from public weapons contracts with Saudi Arabia and Pakistan to fund Balladur’s presidential election campaign. Molins’s formal recommendations follow a lengthy judicial investigation into what has become known in France as “the Karachi affair”, a complex and far-reaching alleged corruption scam which surfaced after the murders of 11 French naval engineers in the Pakistani port city in 2002.

  • French government caves in to pressure from food lobby over junk food

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    French prime minister Édouard Philippe and agriculture and foods minister Didier Guillaume at the Agriculture Show in Paris. © Ministère de l'agriculture French prime minister Édouard Philippe and agriculture and foods minister Didier Guillaume at the Agriculture Show in Paris. © Ministère de l'agriculture

    The food industry is happy with the French government's new food and nutrition plan which, from its point of view, has rejected the most worrying measures that had been recommended by health experts. And according to a document obtained by Mediapart, the industry is also opposed to the carrying out of a study into the health risks posed by eating ultra-processed foods. Karl Laske reports on the results of a joint investigation between Mediapart and consumer group Que Choisir.