Jade Lindgaard

Consulter ici ma déclaration d'intérêts.

A Mediapart je travaille sur l'écologie, le climat, l'énergie, les grands projets d'infrastructures, La Zad de Notre-Dame-des-Landes...

Auparavant, j'ai travaillé aux Inrockuptibles. J'ai écrit plusieurs livres, dont  je crise climatique (2014), Le Ba-ba du BHL, avec Xavier de la Porte (2004), et La France Invisible (2006). J'ai été membre du comité de rédaction de la revue Mouvements.

View his profile in the club

Ses Derniers articles

  • Concern at lack of transparency over Lubrizol chemical plant blaze in France

    By
    The fire at the Lubrizol chemical plant at Rouen, northern France, September 26th 2019. © Reuters The fire at the Lubrizol chemical plant at Rouen, northern France, September 26th 2019. © Reuters

    The Lubrizol chemical factory at Rouen in northern France that caught fire on September 26th stores and produces products that are “very dangerous for the environment”, “irritants” and “noxious”, according to reports by the inspectorate in charge of overseeing potentially hazardous sites. In 2016 the inspectorate warned about the risk of the “creation of toxic substances” in the event of a fire. Jade Lindgaard examines the background to the chemical plant where local residents are alarmed about the risk of dangerous pollution.

  • Notre-Dame-des-Landes evictions leave collective experiment in ruins

    Notre-Dame-des-Landes, Monday April 9th. © JL Notre-Dame-des-Landes, Monday April 9th. © JL

    A massive police operation to evict environmental activists occupying farmland in north-west France which was until recently earmarked for the construction of an airport began in the early hours of Monday, marked by violent clashes which left several people injured, and is set to continue through the week. The heavy-handed expulsion of occupants of a number of experimental alternative farming projects on the land at Notre-Dame-des-Landes, during which police used stun grenades and tear gas, was accompanied by the destruction of numerous homes and agricultural installations, including an emblematic collective farm on the site which had hoped to gain official approval for its long-term future.  Christophe Gueugneau and Jade Lindgaard report from Notre-Dame-des-Landes.

  • Fiasco looms for the Lyon-Turin alpine rail project

    By
    Early construction work on the Lyon-Turin rail link tunnel. Early construction work on the Lyon-Turin rail link tunnel.

    The project launched in 2001 to build a high-speed rail link between the southern French city of Lyon and the northern Italian city of Turin, via what is now to be a 57.5 kilometres-long tunnel under the Alps as its centrepiece, is facing mounting opposition from environmentalists and inhabitants of the Maurienne valley in France and the Susa valley in Italy through which the link will pass. The project for the rail link, estimated to cost a total of 26 billion euros, now faces serious legal challenges in France, amid spiralling costs and hesitations over its funding which have drawn sharp criticism from bodies that include France’s national audit court. Jade Lindgaard reports.

  • Fears that 'dangerous' official decree paves way for concreting of French regions

    By

    The French authorities have quietly issued a decree to state officials in some regions that allows them to depart from the normal rules when it comes to projects concerned with the environment, farmland, forests, local development projects and urban policy. The rules are being relaxed as part of an experiment to give decision makers in certain regions greater flexibility. But lawyers representing environmental groups say the move could open the way to more projects that cause pollution and are harmful for the environment. One has called the decree 'absurd and dangerous'. Jade Lindgaard reports.

  • Environmentalists rejoice as France's 600m-euro Great West airport is finally abandoned

    Activists occupying the site of the Notre-Dame-des-Landes airport celebrate on Wednesday after the government's decision to abandon the project. © Reuters Activists occupying the site of the Notre-Dame-des-Landes airport celebrate on Wednesday after the government's decision to abandon the project. © Reuters

    French Prime Minister Édouard Philippe announced on Wednesday that a controversial plan to build a major new airport near Nantes in north-west France, a project first mooted 50 years ago and which was bitterly opposed by environmentalists who prevented construction work from commencing by occupying the rural site, has been definitively abandoned. The decision ends decades of fudging by successive governments, infuriating supporters of the 600-million-euro project at Notre-Dame-des-Landes who argued it would have provided a much needed boost to the region’s economy.

  • Palavas-les-Flots, a French seaside resort heading under water

    By

    Palavas-les-Flots is a popular seaside resort in the Languedoc region of southern France, one of several built up during a government-driven programme launched in the 1960s to develop tourism along western Mediterranean seaboard. But the town, like others in the region, now faces future disaster from the slow but certain rise in the level of the sea and coastal erosion exacerbated by mass tourism. Mediapart environment correspondent Jade Lindgaard reports from Palavas-les-Flots.

  • Magistrate grounds France’s ‘Great West’ airport project

    By
    Wall of defence: thousands of opponents' sticks line the boundary of the new airport site. (JL) Wall of defence: thousands of opponents' sticks line the boundary of the new airport site. (JL)

    Government plans to build a controversial 580-million-euro “Great West” airport in countryside near the town of Nantes in north-west France received a major blow earlier this week when a magistrate ruled that the environmental damage could not be justified by economic opportunity. The shock decision against a project that has been more than fifty years in the making, and which is ardently championed by Prime Minister Manuel Valls while hotly contested by ecologists, is now under review by a panel of judges who will give a final decision early next week. Jade Lindgaard reports from Nantes.

    Update Monday November 14th: The magistrate's ruling was overturned by the panel of judges in Nantes on Monday. Airport opponents announced they are now to lodge an appeal before France's highest administrative court, the Council of State.

  • Historic damages award for French factory workers harmed by pesticides

    By
    Press conference by former Triskalia workers at Rennes, September 9th, 2016. © JL Press conference by former Triskalia workers at Rennes, September 9th, 2016. © JL

    In a legal first in France, a court has awarded damages to two ex-employees of a Brittany animal feed firm after they were exposed to pesticides at work. The award is a milestone because it recognises that what is known as 'multiple chemical sensitivity' from pesticide exposure is an occupational disease, and lays the blame squarely with the employer. The ruling also recognises that agricultural workers can be affected even if they do not work in the fields. Jade Lindgaard reports.

  • Paris air pollution causes 'thousands' of deaths a year

    By
    A smoggy Paris on March 18th, 2015. © Gonzalo Fuentes/Reuters A smoggy Paris on March 18th, 2015. © Gonzalo Fuentes/Reuters

    Last Sunday Paris banned cars from many of its roads and on Monday the city's councillors voted to pedestrianise a busy route along the River Seine. Both measures are aimed at tackling the problem of air pollution that is affecting Paris as well as other large French cities. It is estimated that such pollution kills up to 2,500 people a year in the French capital, some 60 times more people than perish in road accidents on the city's streets. Mediapart's environment correspondent Jade Lindgaard reports.

  • How biggest polluters earn most from EU farm subsidies

    By
    Farmers protesting outside the headquarters of dairy firm Lactalis, at Laval, central-west France, August 23rd. ©Reuters Farmers protesting outside the headquarters of dairy firm Lactalis, at Laval, central-west France, August 23rd. ©Reuters

    As European farm ministers met earlier this month at a château in France's Loire Valley to reframe EU agricultural policy, a detailed study of European farm aid has revealed a major contradiction right at the heart of that policy; that the most polluting farms actually receive the most cash from subsidies. And amid French farmers' protests against falling prices and shrivelling incomes, the study also showed that in the current economic context, the usual strategy of continually boosting production is no longer an option. Jade Lindgaard reports.