How France's postal service has failed to deliver on cutting CO2 emissions

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In its public utterances France's portal service La Poste makes great play of its “carbon neutrality”. Yet an analysis shows that over the last decade and a half the publicly-owned postal group has been emitting more and more carbon dioxide each year transporting letters and parcels. The reason for this is the operator's complete reliance on using the most polluting forms of transport – air and road – to carry the mail. Mediapart's environment correspondent Jade Lindgaard reports.

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Faced with the looming climate disaster, companies are keen to highlight the efforts they are making to cut their emissions of carbon dioxide, the main greenhouse gas. France's postal service La Poste, which is 100% publicly-owned – the state investment bank Caisse des Dépôts has a 66% stake and the French state 34% - is no exception. Indeed, in its public utterances the postal service has been very bullish on the issue, claiming it is the “first postal operation to be 100% carbon neutral”, thanks in particular to its fleet of electric vehicles.