Macron outlines new law to prevent Islamic 'separatism' in France

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In keynote speech, French president said local officials will get extra powers to fight radicalism and social problems will be tackled.

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Emmanuel Macron has announced a law against religious “separatism” aimed at freeing Islam in France from “foreign influences”, reports The Guardian.

In a long-awaited declaration, the French president outlined new measures to “defend the republic and its values and ensure it respects its promises of equality and emancipation”.

The measures to combat “radical Islamism” and terrorism suggested a carrot-and-stick approach: local officials will be given extra legal powers to combat extremism while money will be invested in education – particularly of Islamic culture and civilisation – and to deal with other social problems including housing and poverty.

“Our challenge is to fight against those who go off the rails in the name of religion … while protecting those who believe in Islam and are full citizens of the republic,” Macron said.

His speech on Friday was a broad outline of the measures to come, which he said would be drawn up in the next two weeks for a law to be presented in December.

The measures include placing mosques under greater control and requiring that imams are trained and certified in France.

Read more of this report from The Guardian.

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