France lures US climate scientists with anti-Trump relocation grants


French President Emmanuel Macron is to announce on Monday evening the names of winners of so-called 'Make Our Planet Great Again' grants offered to US-based climate scientists to relocate to France to work on projects of three to five years, and which were created to counter US President Donald Trump's pullout from the 2015 UN-led global accord in Paris on measures to reduce climate change.  

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Several US-based climate scientists are about to hit the jackpot, as French President Emmanuel Macron prepares to award them multi-year, all-expenses-paid grants to relocate to France, reports ABC News.

The "Make Our Planet Great Again" grants are part of Macron's efforts to counter US President Donald Trump on the climate change front. Macron announced a competition for the projects in June, hours after Trump declared he would withdraw the US from the global accord reached in Paris in 2015 to reduce climate-damaging emissions.

Macron is unveiling the first winners Monday evening at a startup incubator in Paris called Station F, where Microsoft and smaller tech companies are announcing projects to finance activities aimed at reducing emissions.

Monday's event is a prelude to a bigger climate summit Tuesday aimed at giving new impetus to the Paris accord and finding new funding to help governments and businesses meet its goals.

More than 50 world leaders are expected in Paris for the "One Planet Summit," co-hosted by the UN and the World Bank. Trump was not invited.

Initially aimed at American researchers, the research grants were expanded to other non-French climate scientists, according to organizers. Candidates need to be known for working on climate issues, have completed a thesis and propose a project that would take between three to five years.

The time frame would cover Trump's current presidential term.

Read more of this AP report published by ABC News.


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