Charlie Hebdo attack: France tightens net in manhunt

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The hunt is focused on an area of Picardy where the two fugitives were reportedly last seen on Thursday morning when robbing a petrol station.

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Police are searching a rural region of northern France in the hunt for Islamist gunmen who attacked Charlie Hebdo magazine, reports the BBC.

The hunt is focused on an area of Picardy where the two fugitives were reportedly last seen on Thursday morning when robbing a petrol station.

New vigils have been held worldwide for the 12 victims of Wednesday's massacre.

Muslim leaders have asked mosques across France to condemn the Islamist attack at Friday prayers.

Eight journalists, two police officers, a caretaker and a visitor died when two masked men armed with assault rifles burst into the Paris offices. Eleven people were wounded, four of them critically.

The attackers, who shouted Islamist slogans, are believed to have been angered by the satirical magazine's irreverent depictions of the Prophet Muhammad.

They are said to have shouted "We are al-Qaeda, Yemen", an apparent reference to the al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula group (AQAP).

In the US, a senior official has told reporters that one of the two brothers alleged to have carried out the attack, Said Kouachi, spent "a few months" training in Yemen with the group.

He is thought to have trained in small arms combat and marksmanship.

Said and his younger brother, convicted terrorist Cherif Kouachi, were on a US no-fly list before the attack, a US counter-terrorism official told the New York Times.

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