Covid crisis in French Polynesia surpasses deadly surge in Caribbean

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Staff at the hospital in Taaone, Papeete, the capital of French Polynesia, have been forced to install two dozen beds in the entry hall to the establishment.

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The Pacific territory of French Polynesia is now reporting 2,731 coronavirus infections for every 100,000 inhabitants, far in excess of the disastrous figures in the French Caribbean territories of Guadeloupe and Martinique. Fewer than 30 percent of French Polynesians have been fully vaccinated, reports RFI

Staff at the hospital in Taaone, Papeete, the capital of French Polynesia, have been forced to install two dozen beds in the entry hall to the establishment, currently submerged by a wave of coronavirus victims.

A team of health workers arrived earlier this week from New Caledonia this to help manage the situation.

The rate of infection in the Pacific island chain far exceeds the 1,700 cases per 100,000 reported last week in Guadeloupe, and the 1,200 per 100,000 in Martinique, both described as requiring urgent action by French Health Minister, Olivier Véran, on his visit to the Antilles last week.

The coronavirus appeared to have been banished from French Polynesia, with practically no local infections reported between March and June.

The Delta variant has dramatically changed that picture, with 2,731 cases now being reported for every 100,000 inhabitants.

Read more of this report from RFI

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