Yann Philippin

Diplômé de l'IEP de Grenoble et du Centre de formation des journalistes (CFJ) de Paris, j'ai démarré ma carrière en 2000 comme journaliste économique, d'abord spécialisé dans les technologies, puis les entreprises. J'ai travaillé pour le magazine Futur(e)s, comme indépendant, à l'agence Reuters, au Journal du Dimanche, puis à Libération, aux services économie puis investigation. J'ai couvert de nombreux secteurs de l'économie française (aéronautique, automobile, santé, industrie, transports...) et enquêté sur des affaires économiques (Airbus, crash du vol Rio Paris d'Air France, Mediator, accident SNCF de Brétigny, fortune belge de Bernard Arnault, affaire Qatar-Veolia...) puis politico-financières (Tapie, Dassault). Je suis le co-auteur du livre Dassault Système (Robert Laffont), avec ma consoeur de France Inter Sara Ghibaudo.

J'ai rejoint Mediapart au services enquêtes en mars 2015. Spécialisé dans les affaires financières, de fraude fiscale et de corruption, je travaille notamment sur les "leaks", ces fuites de données massives qui ont nourri les enquêtes Football Leaks ou Malta Files, publiées par Mediapart avec ses partenaires du réseau European Investigative Collaborations (EIC).

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Ses Derniers articles

  • The Malta Files: lifting the lid on a tax haven that costs Europe a fortune

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    St.George's Square in the Maltese capital Valletta. © Reuters St.George's Square in the Maltese capital Valletta. © Reuters

    Malta, which currently heads the European Union's rotating presidency, relies on more than tourism as a source of revenue. Its secretive financial structures and generous tax schemes serve to make it one of the EUs most attractive havens for tax avoidance and money laundering by individuals and corporations and which cost other countries billions of euros in lost revenues, reveals a four-month investigation by Mediapart and its partners in the European Investigative Collaborations journalistic collective (EIC).

  • The meagre means of France's anti-corruption agencies

    The extent of political and financial corruption in France has been highlighted by the scandal-plagued French presidential elections, with two of the frontrunning candidates, conservative nominee François Fillon and the far-right challenger Marine Le Pen, engulfed in graft accusations. Following the case of Jérôme Cahuzac, the socialist budget minister tax-fraud tsar who, Mediapart revealed, held a secret foreign bank account over two decades, several new anti-corruption agencies were created to fight a seemingly endemic problem. But, in a series of interviews with Mediapart, investigators and magistrates denounce a dire and crippling lack of resources.

  • Was murder of two French journalists in Mali linked to unpaid ransoms?

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    Image from a video in which AQMI claimed responsibility for taking the hostages in Niger. Image from a video in which AQMI claimed responsibility for taking the hostages in Niger.

    In November 2013 two journalists from French public broadcaster RFI, Ghislaine Dupont and Claude Verlon, were kidnapped and killed while on assignment in the north of Mali. The exact reasons why the pair were killed have never been clear. Now an investigation suggests the murders may have been a revenge attack after the jihadist kidnappers of four other French hostages had not received all the ransom reportedly paid to secure their release. Yann Philippin reports.

  • The hidden activities of the clan behind Doyen Sports

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    Tevfik Arif (r), with Kazakh-Israeli oligarch Alexander Mashkevitch (c) and Russian businessman Musa Bazhaev, in 2009. © EIC Tevfik Arif (r), with Kazakh-Israeli oligarch Alexander Mashkevitch (c) and Russian businessman Musa Bazhaev, in 2009. © EIC

    One of the biggest investment funds in European football, Doyen Sports Investments, is controlled by a secretive Kazakh family who made their fortune in a chemicals plant and who hide their vast wealth in the British Virgin Islands. Tevfik Arif, who was for several years a business partner of US president-elect Donald Trump, is the ‘public face’ of the clan of four brothers who run the family’s business activities and who enjoy close links to several oligarchs from the former Soviet Union. In a series of further revelations from documents obtained from the Football Leaks platform by the journalistic consortium European Investigative Collaborations (EIC), Yann Philippin lifts the lid on one of football’s best-kept secrets.

  • Trump's partnership with the Kazakh businessman he says he hardly knew

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    Donald Trump and Tefvik Arif in 2007. Donald Trump and Tefvik Arif in 2007.

    Tevfik Arif is one of the key figures to feature in a series of revelations stemming from documents from the whistle-blowing platform Football Leaks and obtained by the European Investigative Collaborations (EIC) journalistic collective, in which Mediapart is a partner. The Kazakh-Turkish businessman is one of four brothers behind the secretive Doyen Group, and built a property development company in the US largely thanks to his controversial partnership with president-elect Donald Trump, including the construction of the Trump SoHo building in New York. Martine Orange and Yann Philippin report on an association which Trump now claims he has difficulty in remembering.  

  • Billionaire Dassault on trial over hidden offshore cash

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    Serge Dassault, the head of the aviation and defence group that bears his name, a right-wing senator and France's sixth richest person, is accused of laundering the proceeds of tax fraud and of hiding part of his wealth from Parliamentary authorities. The trial, which started on Monday July 4th, focuses on cash hidden in offshore accounts which was allegedly later used to buy votes in the town near Paris where Dassault was mayor. As Yann Philippin reports, the origins of some of these accounts goes back to the days of Serge Dassault's father Marcel, who founded the aviation group.

  • French billionaire Serge Dassault's 'foot soldier' jailed for attempted murder

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    Billionaire Serge Dassault was called as a trial witness but said he was unable to attend. © Reuters Billionaire Serge Dassault was called as a trial witness but said he was unable to attend. © Reuters

    On Wednesday May 18th Younès Bounouara was jailed for 15 years after being found guilty of trying to kill a man whose secret recording helped expose alleged vote buying by industrialist Serge Dassault in the town where the latter was mayor for many years. The verdict will come as a major embarrassment for Dassault, who has had close ties with Bounouara for more than 20 years. The two men are currently under investigation over the alleged system of vote buying. Yann Philippin reports.

  • Mossack Fonseca's key role in French corruption cases

    panamapapers

    The Panama Papers revelations have rocked the world with disclosures of how Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca mounted offshore financial structures for the rich and powerful that enable tax evasion and money laundering on a staggering scale. Beyond the sensational cases emerging in the leaked documents, Mossack Fonseca is also cited in several judicial investigations into some of the most important corruption scandals in France over recent years. Fabrice Arfi, Karl Laske, Mathilde Mathieu, Yann Philippin and Ellen Salvi report.

  • How Belgium became a terrorist hub – and target

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    The attacks in Brussels on Tuesday March 22nd highlight once again how Belgium has become a nerve centre of jihadist terrorism in Europe, as well as being a target itself. The Belgian network led by Abdelhamid Abaaoud, who led the November 13th bombings in Paris, was very active while the logistical 'expert' for the Paris attacks, Salah Abdeslam, who was arrested just last week, is suspected of having been involved in planning the latest attacks in the Belgian capital. Earlier this year, meanwhile, Europol warned of the risk of more attacks. As Belgian authorities identified three men with links to the Paris attacks as the Brussels suicide bombers, Matthieu Suc and Yann Philippin consider how Belgium has become a terrorist hub.

  • Former Qatari ruler's firm targeted by French 'money laundering' investigation

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    Former ruler of Qatar, Sheik Hamad bin Khalifa Al-Thani. © Reuters Former ruler of Qatar, Sheik Hamad bin Khalifa Al-Thani. © Reuters

    The Paris public prosecutor’s office has opened an investigation into a suspected money laundering operation involving Qatari Sheik Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani’s French investment arm, French Properties Management (FPM), Mediapart can reveal. The probe, prompted by information from a whistleblowing former employee of FPM, is the latest to target the activities of the Paris-based firm, which is also cited in two other separate judicial investigations in France for “misuse of company assets” and “corruption and influence peddling”. Yann Philippin reports.