Mathieu Magnaudeix

Né en 1980 à Périgueux (Dordogne). A Mediapart, j'ai suivi l'actualité économique et sociale, la révolution tunisienne, le quinquennat de François Hollande, raconté l'OPA d'Emmanuel Macron sur la présidence de la République, couvert le mandat Trump depuis les Etats-Unis.

Désormais co-présentateur d' «A l'air libre », l'émission quotidienne en accès libre de Mediapart.

Fier adhérent, et co-fondateur, de l'Association des journalistes LGBT.

Livres:

- Tunis Connection, enquête sur les réseaux franco-tunisiens sous Ben Ali (Seuil 2012), avec Lénaïg Bredoux.

- Macron & Cie, enquête sur le nouveau président de la République (Don Quichotte, 2017, avec la rédaction de Mediapart).

- Génération Ocasio-Cortez, les nouveaux activistes américains (La Découverte, 2020).

Pour me contacter: @mathieu_m sur Twitter (DM ouverts) ou mathieu.magnaudeix@mediapart.fr.  (photo: Sébastien Calvet/Mediapart)

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Ses Derniers articles

  • French labour law reform: anatomy of a political fiasco

    Facing the storm: employment minister Myriam El Khomri and prime minister Manuel Valls. © Reuters Facing the storm: employment minister Myriam El Khomri and prime minister Manuel Valls. © Reuters

    On Monday February 29th the prime minister Manuel Valls announced that the government was postponing for two weeks the formal presentation of a new bill reforming employment law. This concession came after days of vociferous opposition to the bill from trade unions, students and many members of France's ruling Socialist Party itself who see the measure as an attack on workers' rights. Mediapart's Lénaïg Bredoux, Rachida El Azzouzi, Mathilde Goanec and Mathieu Magnaudeix analyse how what was intended to be a flagship government reform went so badly wrong.

  • Ségolène Royal, a political revenant who has become irremovable

    By
    Ségolène Royal with Cuban President Raul Castro at a ceremony in front of the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, February 1st. © Reuters Ségolène Royal with Cuban President Raul Castro at a ceremony in front of the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, February 1st. © Reuters

    Ségolène Royal has led an up and down political career over three decades. After serving three ministerial posts and three terms as an MP, she lost, as socialist candidate, the 2007 presidential elections to Nicolas Sarkozy, narrowly lost her 2008 bid to become Socialist Party leader, was humiliated in the 2011 socialist primaries, and lost in legislative elections in 2012. But, retaining a power base as a local council leader in mid-west France, the 63-year-old former wife of President François Hollande is now back in the stable of power. Made environment minister in 2014, her ministry emerged from this month’s government reshuffle with added powers, including her role as president of post-COP 21 UN climate talks. But she is also regarded as a key figure for Hollande’s hopes of re-election in 2017. Mathieu Magnaudeix reports.

  • How plan to remove French nationality has become a farce

    By
    Caught in their own trap? President François Hollande and prime minister Manuel Valls. Caught in their own trap? President François Hollande and prime minister Manuel Valls.

    On Friday February 5th, 2016, the National Assembly began debating plans to alter the French Constitution, including adding the power to strip convicted terrorists of their French nationality. It was supposed to be President François Hollande's grand response to the Paris terror attacks of 2015. Instead, amid general confusion, the government has become bogged down and endlessly changed its mind over the issue. To the point, argues Mediapart's Mathieu Magnaudeix, where the entire affair has become a national farce.

  • French MPs ponder return of 'national unworthiness' crime

    By

    President François Hollande's socialist government has been at the centre of a political controversy since it announced that convicted dual-national terrorists would be stripped of French nationality. Many of its own supporters on the Left, including senior figures, are bitterly opposed to the idea. Now, as an alternative, some party MPs are suggesting a revival of the old offence of “national unworthiness”, which would entail the citizen concerned losing their civil rights and status, and which was last used at the end of World War II. Mathieu Magnaudeix explains.

  • France’s regional elections made volatile by Paris attacks

    By
    Nieulle-sur-Seudre. © Mathieu Magnaudeix Nieulle-sur-Seudre. © Mathieu Magnaudeix

    Next Sunday France goes to the polls to elect the members of the councils ruling the country’s new administrative regions, and which will be an important test of the popularity of the far-right Front National party tipped to draw strongly increased support. The two-round elections for the 13 new super-regions, created in a reform earlier this year from 22 previous regions, are overshadowed by the immense shock felt across France after the terrorist massacres in Paris last month. Mathieu Magnaudeix travelled before and after the attacks to the new Aquitaine-Poitou-Charentes-Limousin region in south-west France where, bucking the trend, the Socialist Party was confident of victory. On his return visit last weekend, he found that optimism had completely disappeared in the aftermath of the attacks.

  • Defining the troubled notion of secularism in France

    By

    Jean-Louis Bianco is head of France’s Secularism Monitoring Centre, a public body that advises public institutions, local authorities and the private sector, among others, on the country’s laws on secularity and their application. Amid an increasingly tense political debate over multiculturalism in France, the legislation has rarely been so fiercely championed - but also brought into question. To address the misunderstandings by both camps, Bianco travels France each week to discuss the principle and the detail of the law with various sections of the population. Mathieu Magnaudeix followed him on one such trip to a small town in north-east France.

  • Slovak president on migrants: 'We must show our solidarity'

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    The Slovak government is officially opposed to the imposition of migrant quotas on European countries. However, in an interview with Mediapart the president of Slovakia, Andrej Kiska, insists that his country must “abandon” its current stance. “We are capable of doing more for refugees,” he declared, ahead of a meeting of EU interior ministers on Tuesday to discuss how migrants are to be shared between members states. Mathieu Magnaudeix reports.

  • German FM and staff were targets of systematic NSA taps

    By , and Julian Assange (WikiLeaks)

    The phones of German foreign minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier and those of many of his ministry staff were systematically tapped by the US National Security Agency (NSA) in an eavesdropping operation that began at least 15 years ago, Mediapart can reveal in this report in collaboration with WikiLeaks. Confidential NSA documents obtained by WikiLeaks also disclose how Steinmeier, during his first term as foreign minister in 2005, “appeared relieved” to have been spared details of infamous rendition flights operated by the US over German airspace. Jérôme Hourdeaux and Mathieu Magnaudeix report.

  • How the NSA spied on Merkel, her mobile, and the German chancellery

    By , and with Julian Assange

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s mobile phone features on a list of interception targets on a database of the US National Security Agency (NSA), Mediapart can reveal. In an investigation mounted with whistleblower website WikiLeaks, Mediapart details here how more than 50 phone numbers within the German chancellery, including voice and fax landlines into Merkel’s office and those of her senior staff, were for years the target of interceptions by the NSA. The revelations come just one month after German prosecutors dropped an investigation into earlier claims that the NSA tapped Merkel’s mobile due to what they said was a lack of evidence. Jérôme Hourdeaux and Mathieu Magnaudeix, in collaboration with Julian Assange of WikiLeaks, report.

  • President Hollande rejects French asylum for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange

    In an open letter to the French president on Friday the founder of WikiLeaks, Julain Assange, made an apparent appeal for political asylum in France. Assange, whose whistleblowing organisation was behind the recent revelations published by Mediapart and Libération about US spying on French heads of state, said that he faced “political persecution” and that his life was “in danger”. However, within an hour of the publication of the open letter President Hollande's office issued a brusque statement rejecting asylum for Assange, who has spent three years in the Ecuadorian embassy in London to escape extradition to Sweden. As Lénaïg Bredoux, Jérôme Hourdeaux and Mathieu Magnaudeix report, the episode quickly stirred up a row and will inevitably reignite the debate about how far France should be prepared to go in welcoming whistleblowers such as Assange and the former National Security Agency (NSA) employee Edward Snowden.