Mathieu Magnaudeix

Né en 1980 à Périgueux (Dordogne). A Mediapart, j'ai suivi l'actualité économique et sociale, la révolution tunisienne, le quinquennat de François Hollande, raconté l'OPA d'Emmanuel Macron sur la présidence de la République, couvert le mandat Trump depuis les Etats-Unis.

Désormais co-présentateur d' «A l'air libre », l'émission quotidienne en accès libre de Mediapart.

Fier adhérent, et co-fondateur, de l'Association des journalistes LGBT.

Livres:

- Tunis Connection, enquête sur les réseaux franco-tunisiens sous Ben Ali (Seuil 2012), avec Lénaïg Bredoux.

- Macron & Cie, enquête sur le nouveau président de la République (Don Quichotte, 2017, avec la rédaction de Mediapart).

- Génération Ocasio-Cortez, les nouveaux activistes américains (La Découverte, 2020).

Pour me contacter: @mathieu_m sur Twitter (DM ouverts) ou mathieu.magnaudeix@mediapart.fr.  (photo: Sébastien Calvet/Mediapart)

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Ses Derniers articles

  • Macron seeks to balance Left and Right with new government

    The official photo of the new French governemnt, June 2017. © Elysée The official photo of the new French governemnt, June 2017. © Elysée

    Following the recent Parliamentary elections President Emmanuel Macron has formed a new government under the same prime minister Édouard Philippe. However, what was supposed to be a minor technical change to the government has become rather larger in scale after the departure of four ministers in response to potential scandals. The result is a government that gives us a glimpse of how the new centrist president intends to balance his administration between the Left and the Right of the political spectrum. Stéphane Alliès, Christophe Gueugneau, Mathieu Magnaudeix and Mathilde Mathieu report.



  • Macron party gains promise France's new president crushing powers

    By and
    Emmanuel Macron surrounded by his party's candidates, Paris May 13th. © AudreyDufeuSchubert via Twitter Emmanuel Macron surrounded by his party's candidates, Paris May 13th. © AudreyDufeuSchubert via Twitter

    French President Emmanuel Macron’s newly founded centrist party La République En Marche (LREM) is forecast to gain as many as 455 out of parliament’s 577 seats in next Sunday’s second and final round of legislative elections. It emerged from the first round this weekend with massive support across the country, to the backdrop of a record low turnout of less than one in two voters. Macron now appears certain to wield a crushing power to enact his promised major structural reforms, and to be completely untied to his electoral alliance with the centre-right MoDem party. Mathieu Magnaudeix and Ellen Salvi report.

     

  • The secret story behind Macron's campaign fundraising

    Emmanuel Macron in May 2016. © Reuters Emmanuel Macron in May 2016. © Reuters

    In order to finance his election campaign, Emmanuel Macron succeeded in raising almost 13 million euros in what was a remarkable achievement for his maverick centrist political movement En Marche ! created barely one year before his election as president. But contrary to the image put about by his campaign team that it was the result of a spontaneous surge of popular support, the funds were primarily sourced from a powerful network of bankers, financiers and businessmen, as information gathered from the massive leak of hacked En Marche ! internal documents and verified by Mediapart reveals.

  • The pale political renewal of Macron's first government

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    Centrist Sylvie Goulard, the new French defence minister, with socialist Jean-Yves Le Drian, appointed as foreign affairs minister. Centrist Sylvie Goulard, the new French defence minister, with socialist Jean-Yves Le Drian, appointed as foreign affairs minister.

    The makeup of French President Emmanuel Macron’s new government is crucial to his chances of obtaining a parliamentary majority in legislative elections in June, when his République En Marche party faces its first electoral test against the traditional parties of the Left and Right. The maverick centrist has succeeded in including renegade conservatives and socialists, along with his centre-right allies, as well as a key figure from the Green camp and others from “civil society”. But, as Ellen Salvi and Mathieu Magnaudeix report, it nevertheless remains a pale exercise of what was promised to be a political “renewal”.

  • Macron's campaign hampered by his own image

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    Emmanuel Macron at the Chamber of Commerce in Amiens, April 26th, 2017. © Nicolas Serve / Hans Lucas Emmanuel Macron at the Chamber of Commerce in Amiens, April 26th, 2017. © Nicolas Serve / Hans Lucas

    Emmanuel Macron's appeals for a unified front against the far right's Marine Le Pen in the run-off for the presidential election have been hit by a major handicap – himself. The former merchant banker and civil servant's CV, image and policies repel many on both the Left and Right. In response he has sought to offer pledges for those who did not vote for him in the first round. But in essence, says Mathieu Magnaudeix, the centrist candidate is holding to his policy line and is aiming for a major and rapid realignment of French politics if he is elected.

  • Emmanuel Macron, money and his well-heeled backers

    Emmanuel Macron outside 10 Downing Street where he met British PM Theresa May on February 21st, 2017. © Reuters Emmanuel Macron outside 10 Downing Street where he met British PM Theresa May on February 21st, 2017. © Reuters

    The independent centrist candidate Emmanuel Macron has no public money behind him to help his presidential campaign, as he has no established political party. Instead he is relying on donations both via the internet and from private gatherings with wealthy supporters. Opponents have raised questions over the former economy minister's links with the world of money and business, as well as the declarations of his personal assets which seem to suggest he spent large amounts of money while working as a merchant banker. Those rivals seek to paint him as a candidate for “global capitalism”. His entourage are irritated by such a depiction but, given his background in the world of finance, they have little choice but to accept it, report Mathieu Magnaudeix and Mathilde Mathieu.

  • Macron attracts the crowds – but where are his policies?

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    The glitzy Emmanuel Macron rally at Lyon on Saturday February 4th, 2017. © Reuters The glitzy Emmanuel Macron rally at Lyon on Saturday February 4th, 2017. © Reuters

    With just over 70 days to go before the first round of the French presidential election, former economy minister Emmanuel Macron continues to attract large crowds to his rallies and is doing well in the opinion polls. Yet what does the founder of the 'En Marche!' political movement - who keeps talking about “bringing people together” - actually plan to do if he is elected president? Mathieu Magnaudeix attended Macron's latest gathering but came away little the wiser.

  • Implosion looms for French socialists as 'irreconcilable' presidential candidates head for knock-out vote

    Manuel Valls (left) and Benoît Hamon. © Reuters Manuel Valls (left) and Benoît Hamon. © Reuters

    The first round of the French Socialist Party’s primaries to choose its candidate for this spring’s presidential  elections saw leftist former education minister Benoît Hamon arrive in the lead, followed in second place by Manuel Valls, on the party’s Right and who last month resigned as prime minister to take part in the race. Hamon now has a significant chance of winning the second and final round between the two men to be held next Sunday. But whatever the result, the deeply divided Socialist Party faces implosion. Mathieu Magnaudeix and Christophe Gueugneau followed the two camps as the results unfolded during Sunday evening. 

  • 'Hollande and Valls have broken the Left'

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    Mediapart was present at a public meeting at Nanterre, west of Paris, to discuss the forthcoming presidential election when the news broke that President François Hollande would not be standing for re-election in that contest. Many of those present in the hall were supporters of the Left who had voted for Hollande at the 2012 election. Some were quick to voice their dismay at his presidency's record, while the majority expressed general indifference and the meeting quickly resumed. As Mathieu Magnaudeix reports, it was a sign of just how irrelevant the president had already become to many ordinary voters.

  • Tariq Ramadan: profile of a Muslim bogeyman in France

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    Seeking French nationality: Tariq Ramadan © Reuters Seeking French nationality: Tariq Ramadan © Reuters

    Every few years France gets swept up in a controversy over Tariq Ramadan. And since 1995 much of the French establishment has vilified and shunned this Muslim preacher, writer and academic, whom they suspect of advocating radical Islamism and sectarian views. Now the Swiss-born intellectual with Egyptian roots is seeking French nationality in a move that is likely to provoke yet another row. Mathieu Magnaudeix profiles a controversial figure who is almost impossible to classify.