mathieu magnaudeix

Né en 1980, deux ans trop tôt, me dit-on, pour être un millenial. Entre tradition et modernité, j'ai des passions étranges comme l'histoire, la science politique, Véronique Sanson et Elton John.

Je suis diplômé d'histoire, de sciences politiques et de l'Ecole supérieure de journalisme de Lille. J'ai débuté le journalisme à Berlin, au bureau de l'Agence France Presse et à Libération. A Mediapart, je me suis occupé de l'actualité économique et sociale de 2008 à 2012, j'ai suivi le quinquennat de François Hollande puis la campagne présidentielle d'Emmanuel Macron. Depuis octobre 2017, je suis le correspondant de Mediapart au Trumpistan (qui n'est pas que ça). Et toujours un très fier membre de l'Association des journalistes LGBT (AJL), créée en 2013 et qui encourage les rédactions à traiter les sujets LGBT avec précision et justesse.

Livres: Tunis Connection, enquête sur les réseaux franco-tunisiens sous Ben Ali (Seuil 2012), avec Lénaïg Bredoux; et Macron & Cie, enquête sur le nouveau président de la République (Don Quichotte, 2017, avec la rédaction de Mediapart).

Pour me contacter: @mathieu_m sur Twitter ou mathieu.magnaudeix@mediapart.fr.

(photo: © éd. Don Quichotte)

Consulter ici ma déclaration d'intérêts.

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  • Feared and revered: US views on France’s ‘yellow vests’

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    Yellow vest protestors on the Champs-Élysées avenue in Paris, November 2018. © Reuters Yellow vest protestors on the Champs-Élysées avenue in Paris, November 2018. © Reuters

    The two-month-long ‘gilets jaunes’, or ‘yellow vest’, movement in France, protesting the fall in living standards for low- and middle-income earners and against the powers of the country’s social and political elite, continues largely unabated. It has attracted worldwide attention, and not least in the United States, where the Left sees it as an echo of the Occupy Wall Street movement, where also supporters of President Donald Trump have hi-jacked it as a new symbol of protest against the liberal establishment, and where the latter interpret it as a devil of populism. Mediapart’s US correspondent Mathieu Magnaudeix reports from New York on the confused reactions across the Atlantic to the largely misunderstood revolt in France.

  • What it's like being a socialist in the United States

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    One of the rising stars in American socialism, 28-year-old Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. © Reuters One of the rising stars in American socialism, 28-year-old Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. © Reuters

    The very word has been anathema in America for so long. Yet in the wake of Bernie Sanders' strong showing in the Democratic Party primaries ahead of the last presidential election, more and more Americans are calling themselves “socialists”. Some are even winning elections. Mediapart's New York correspondent Mathieu Magnaudeix gives a pen portrait of some of these new candidates on the American Left who are fighting against capitalism as much as they are combating discrimination.

  • Economist Joseph Stiglitz: 'Europe is on the brink'

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    Joseph Stiglitz in Mexico, June 2017. © Reuters Joseph Stiglitz in Mexico, June 2017. © Reuters

    In an interview with Mediapart the celebrated Nobel Prize winner for economics, Joseph Stiglitz, says he is worried about the continuing pursuit of austerity policies in the Eurozone. The economist say he is concerned, too, about President Donald Trump's policies and the explosion in inequality since the financial crisis of 2008. More than ever, he tells Mediapart, there is a need for wages to rise, for better regulation of the financial world and for a war on huge “monopolies”. Mathieu Magnaudeix reports.

     

  • Macron leaves home woes behind on trip to charm US

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    Emmanuel Macron interviewed by Fox News. © Fox News Emmanuel Macron interviewed by Fox News. © Fox News

    French President Emmanuel Macron arrived in the United States on Monday for a three-day state visit, the first of its kind by a foreign head-of-state since the election of Donald Trump as president. Mediapart’s US correspondent Mathieu Magnaudeix analyses American perceptions of the French president as a bulwark against the advance of populist politics and an antidote to Trump, who one US media commentator even ventured to describe as “a beacon for progressives hoping to find their way back to the halls of power across the democratic world”.  

  • How Havas has spun its web around Emmanuel Macron

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    The Havas headquarters in France in Puteaux, a western suburb of Paris. © Reuters The Havas headquarters in France in Puteaux, a western suburb of Paris. © Reuters

    Havas, the communications, marketing and advertising giant owned by French billionaire businessman Vincent Bolloré, has for long played a key role in French politics, steering PR campaigns for both the rising stars and those who have fallen from grace. But its main political influence lies within the machine of government, where it guides ministerial strategies and former staff find new careers as senior advisors and heads of communications departments. As Mathieu Magnaudeix and Ellen Salvi report, with the election of Emmanuel Macron the network of the “Havas boys”, as one former minister described them, has never been more active at the heart of power.

  • Macron seeks to balance Left and Right with new government

    The official photo of the new French governemnt, June 2017. © Elysée The official photo of the new French governemnt, June 2017. © Elysée

    Following the recent Parliamentary elections President Emmanuel Macron has formed a new government under the same prime minister Édouard Philippe. However, what was supposed to be a minor technical change to the government has become rather larger in scale after the departure of four ministers in response to potential scandals. The result is a government that gives us a glimpse of how the new centrist president intends to balance his administration between the Left and the Right of the political spectrum. Stéphane Alliès, Christophe Gueugneau, Mathieu Magnaudeix and Mathilde Mathieu report.



  • Macron party gains promise France's new president crushing powers

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    Emmanuel Macron surrounded by his party's candidates, Paris May 13th. © AudreyDufeuSchubert via Twitter Emmanuel Macron surrounded by his party's candidates, Paris May 13th. © AudreyDufeuSchubert via Twitter

    French President Emmanuel Macron’s newly founded centrist party La République En Marche (LREM) is forecast to gain as many as 455 out of parliament’s 577 seats in next Sunday’s second and final round of legislative elections. It emerged from the first round this weekend with massive support across the country, to the backdrop of a record low turnout of less than one in two voters. Macron now appears certain to wield a crushing power to enact his promised major structural reforms, and to be completely untied to his electoral alliance with the centre-right MoDem party. Mathieu Magnaudeix and Ellen Salvi report.

     

  • The secret story behind Macron's campaign fundraising

    Emmanuel Macron in May 2016. © Reuters Emmanuel Macron in May 2016. © Reuters

    In order to finance his election campaign, Emmanuel Macron succeeded in raising almost 13 million euros in what was a remarkable achievement for his maverick centrist political movement En Marche ! created barely one year before his election as president. But contrary to the image put about by his campaign team that it was the result of a spontaneous surge of popular support, the funds were primarily sourced from a powerful network of bankers, financiers and businessmen, as information gathered from the massive leak of hacked En Marche ! internal documents and verified by Mediapart reveals.

  • The pale political renewal of Macron's first government

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    Centrist Sylvie Goulard, the new French defence minister, with socialist Jean-Yves Le Drian, appointed as foreign affairs minister. Centrist Sylvie Goulard, the new French defence minister, with socialist Jean-Yves Le Drian, appointed as foreign affairs minister.

    The makeup of French President Emmanuel Macron’s new government is crucial to his chances of obtaining a parliamentary majority in legislative elections in June, when his République En Marche party faces its first electoral test against the traditional parties of the Left and Right. The maverick centrist has succeeded in including renegade conservatives and socialists, along with his centre-right allies, as well as a key figure from the Green camp and others from “civil society”. But, as Ellen Salvi and Mathieu Magnaudeix report, it nevertheless remains a pale exercise of what was promised to be a political “renewal”.

  • Macron's campaign hampered by his own image

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    Emmanuel Macron at the Chamber of Commerce in Amiens, April 26th, 2017. © Nicolas Serve / Hans Lucas Emmanuel Macron at the Chamber of Commerce in Amiens, April 26th, 2017. © Nicolas Serve / Hans Lucas

    Emmanuel Macron's appeals for a unified front against the far right's Marine Le Pen in the run-off for the presidential election have been hit by a major handicap – himself. The former merchant banker and civil servant's CV, image and policies repel many on both the Left and Right. In response he has sought to offer pledges for those who did not vote for him in the first round. But in essence, says Mathieu Magnaudeix, the centrist candidate is holding to his policy line and is aiming for a major and rapid realignment of French politics if he is elected.